Archive - Mar 2015


March 30th

March 30, 2015--Federal funding in short supply for rural water projects (Washington Times)

A pipeline project intended to bring billions of gallons of water a year to a drought-stricken section of eastern New Mexico represents a lifeline to parched communities that are quickly running out of water. The lifeline, however, might not reach the region for more than a decade, even though officials say some areas don’t have that long before wells dry up.

March 30, 2015--Glimpses of the future: Drought damage leads to widespread forest death (Science Daily)

The 2000-2003 drought in the American southwest triggered a widespread die-off of forests around the region. A Carnegie-led team of scientists developed a new modeling tool to explain how and where trembling aspen forests died as a result of this drought. It is based on damage to the individual trees' ability to transport water under water-stressed conditions.

March 30, 2015--What severe drought in the Colorado River Basin looks like (Washington Post)

Lake Powell, one of the nation’s largest reservoirs, is now below 45 percent of its capacity. Straddling the border between Utah and Arizona, the man-made reservoir is part of the Colorado Water Basin that supplies water to 40 million people.

March 29, 2015--Tipton will re-introduce his water rights measure (Grand Junction Sentinel)

U.S. Rep. Scott Tipton, R-Colo., will tweak a previous measure of his to have the federal government recognize states’ water laws, Tipton said Saturday at the Club 20 spring meeting. A measure he plans to carry this Congress will take aim at a U.S. Forest Service directive he criticized as an overreach on control of groundwater.

March 28, 2015--Colorado's Water Plan close, but not there yet (Denver Post)

In December, Colorado will issue a comprehensive state water plan. The importance of this endeavor cannot be overstated: If done well, it can measurably improve our use of water and help to strengthen our quality of life and economy. This initiative is unprecedented, daring to go where previous efforts have failed.

March 27th

March 26, 2015--Managers: Drought could go 15 years (Dolores Star)

Today's snow will soon be used to irrigate farms, but it won't be enough for a bumper crop. Water managers at the Ag Expo explained water issues through the lens of a drought that's lingered in the region since 2000. In some ways, things have worked out as they should, said Eric Kuhn, of the Colorado River Conservation District.

March 25th

March 25, 2015--Thirty new bean varieties bred to beat baking climate (Reuters)

Scientists have bred 30 new varieties of "heat-beating" beans designed to provide protein for the world's poor in the face of global warming, researchers announced on Wednesday.

March 24, 2015--New national standard helps protect public water supplies (Water Online)

Global public health organization NSF International has published the first consensus-based American National Standard to evaluate the performance of municipal water filtration technologies in removing Cryptosporidium from public drinking water supplies.

March 24, 2015--Finding the right price for water (Atlantic)

There's a classic economic paradox about the price of water and value, and it comes from Adam Smith: Why do diamonds cost more than water? The comparison is meant to demonstrate how pricing works—that even though water is essential for human survival, our economy puts prices on things based on scarcity and value (and marginal utility).

March 24, 2015--Japan to build 250-mile-long, four storey-high wall to stop tsunamis (Independent)

Japanese authorities have unveiled plans to build a giant 250-mile long sea barrier to protect its coastline from devastating tsunamis. According to the proposals, the £4.6bn ($6.8bn) barrier would reach 12.5m high in some places – stretching taller than a four storey building.