Archive - Jun 2015


June 29th


The Animas River Stakeholders Group is trying to get citizen participation in advocating for Good Samaritan Legislation via a website Trout Unlimited has set up. Please sign the petition to finally get common-sense legislation to help clean up our rivers!

June 29, 2015--In a water-scarce West of the future, who will be hit hardest? (Conversation)

Despite recent flooding in Colorado and Texas, the multi-year California drought has brought water scarcity to the forefront of conversation throughout the West. There has been lots of debate in the media and in scientific circles about whether this drought is a preview of a “new normal” for western water.

June 29, 2015--Lake Mead decline below 1,075 feet is symbolic (

If New Year’s Day had happened last week, the Central Arizona Project would have suffered the first water shortage in its 35-year history. That’s because Lake Mead — where CAP water is stored at the Nevada border — dropped below 1,075 feet elevation late Tuesday, and stayed that way off and on the rest of the week. That’s the level at which the federal go

June 29, 2015--EPA to plug Silverton mine soon (Durango Herald)

Mine remediation and greater monitoring above Silverton this summer will help ease the level of poisonous metals in the Animas River, at least at first. At the Red and Bonita Mine, where polluted water is pouring out at 500 gallons per minute, Environmental Protection Agency workers would like to put a stop to the flow by September, said Steven Way, on-scene coordinator for the agency.&nbs

June 28, 2015--Can cloud-seeding ride to the rescue? (Mountain Town News)

After a so-so winter, the snow piled up through May in the mountains of Colorado, taking the edge off drought. This takes the edge off of the big Colorado River reservoirs, Lake Mead and Lake Powell.

June 27, 2015--World’s aquifers losing replenishment race, researchers say (New York Times)

From the Arabian Peninsula to northern India to California’s Central Valley, nearly a third of the world’s 37 largest aquifers are being drained faster than they are being replenished, according to a recent study led by scientists at the University of California, Irvine.

June 26, 2015--Colorado River shortage requires basin states to work together (Utah Public Radio)

The water level at Lake Mead reached a record low on Wednesday, forcing federal water managers to guide the level back above a crucial drought trigger point. Special interest groups are asking political leaders to work together to find ways to better manage water challenges in the West.

June 26, 2015--Bureau of Reclamation planning recreation work at Lake Nighthorse (Pine River Times)

The U.S. Bureau of Reclamation has plans to build an entrance station and boat decontamination station at Lake Nighthorse, according to Brent Rheese, the bureau's Upper Colorado River regional director, who last week attended a meeting in Durango of the four-state Upper Colorado River Commission.

June 25, 2015--Durango’s water gets refresh (Durango Herald)

The water flowing from city taps should taste a bit better now that the city is phasing in a new treatment process. Rather than using chlorine tablets, the city is using a solution of chlorine and peroxide to purify water at the city’s treatment plant east of Fort Lewis College, said Steve Salka, the city’s utilities director.

June 25, 2015--How a historical blunder helped create the water crisis in the West (NPR)

In 1922, seven Western states — Colorado, Utah, New Mexico, Arizona, Nevada, Wyoming and California — drew up an agreement on how to divide the waters of the Colorado River. But there was one big problem with the plan: They overestimated how much water the river could provide. As a result, each state was promised more water than actually exists.