July 11th, 2016

July 11, 2016--Fishermen get good news about Animas River after mine spill (CBS News)

Wildlife officials shared some good news, saying their testing shows the fish survived with no evidence of die-offs. But the problems are far from over. “Hopefully it brought some awareness to that, and hopefully they start to clean some of that stuff up so that it will still hold fish for a long time,” fisherman Max Westheimer said.

July 10, 2016--Gold King Mine spill-related legislation inches forward (Durango Herald)

In the last year, Sens. Michael Bennet, D-Colo., and Cory Gardner, R-Colo., as well as Rep. Scott Tipton, R-Cortez, and Rep.

July 8th

July 9, 2016--Floating solar is a win-win energy solution for drought-stricken US lakes (Guardian)

The Colorado River’s two great reservoirs, Lake Mead and Lake Powell, are in retreat. Multi-year droughts and chronic overuse have taken their toll, to be sure, but vast quantities of water are also lost to evaporation.

July 8, 2016--Pollution control systems added to Rico Argentine mine (Cortez Journal)

After last year’s Gold King Mine blowout near Silverton, which dumped 3 million gallons of heavy metals into the Animas River, eyes turned to the Rico Argentine mine. The long-closed site is on about 80 acres just north of Rico. Its leaking St.

July 8, 2016--Hickenlooper backs $380 million Denver Water project to divert Colorado River water (Denver Water)

Colorado leaders on Wednesday formally backed Denver Water’s $380 million project to nearly triple the capacity of a Front Range reservoir and divert more water from the Colorado River Basin. Denver Water’s Moffat expansion project, 13 years in the making, “aligns with the key elements of Colorado’s Water Plan,” Gov.

July 7th

July 7, 2016--Colorado funding cuts make reservoirs more vulnerable to invasive species (Summit Daily)

While state funding has started drying up, a noted disturbance remains quite fluid. Two problematic varieties of freshwater shellfish — the zebra and quagga mussel — are always of concern at area water bodies where they are an aquatic nuisance species, or ANS.

July 6th

July 6, 2016--RRCC offers degree in water quality management (Lakewood Sentinel)

This fall, Red Rocks Community College makes Colorado history by offering a bachelor of applied science degree in water quality management technology. Red Rocks is the first community college in the state to offer a BAS degree, the result oftwo years of work by college faculty. “The accreditation to offer a BAS will expand the learning opportunities for the students,” said

July 6, 2016--Droughts of the future will not be the droughts of the past (USGS)

Due to its prevalence and implications for humans, wildlife, and ecosystems, drought is a focal research theme of the North Central Climate Science Center (NC CSC). From December 7-8, 2015, twenty-eight scientists, managers, and communicators gathered in Fort Collins, CO to discuss and synthesize the existing knowledge of climate change and ecological drought across the North Central region.

July 5th

July 5, 2016--Why a half-degree temperature rise is a big deal (NASA)

The Paris Agreement, which delegates from 196 countries hammered out in December 2015, calls for holding the ongoing rise in global average temperature to “well below 2 °C above pre-industrial levels,” while “pursuing efforts to limit the temperature increase to 1.5 °C.” How much difference could that half-degree of wiggle room (or 0.9 degree on the Fahrenheit sc

July 4, 2016--Agriculture community also affected by oil and gas slowdown (Greeley Tribune)

When the South Platte River flows high, Chuck Sylvester doesn’t get nervous. He grew up on the river. His family’s farm has been in LaSalle for 150 years. High water, low water — he’s seen it all more times than he can count. But he’s only seen the water rise higher than the doorknob of his garage once.