Archive

February 11th, 2015

February 10, 2015--House approves ‘flex-use’ water bill (Grand Junction Sentinel)

Several Western Slope lawmakers didn’t get their way Tuesday on a bill that is designed to prevent so-called buy-and-dry tactics on water rights for farms and ranches.


February 10, 2015--GOP challenges Obama over flood risks from climate change (State)

Underscoring the political challenges President Barack Obama faces as he presses ahead to combat climate change, eight Republican senators are contesting the legality of his Jan. 30 directive toughening floodplain standards for new federal projects. In a letter to Obama last week that was coordinated by Mississippi Sen.


February 10, 2015--A human right to water: A wave forward (Huff Post)

World leaders at the Davos World Economic Forum last month identified the scarcity of water as the leading threat facing the world over the next decade. Roughly 750 million people around the world lack access to clean water. In addition, more than 300 million people die each year from diseases related to unsafe water.


February 10, 2015--Lake Nighthorse construction likely this summer (Durango Herald)

Construction on some facilities at Lake Nighthorse could start this summer, after the Ute tribes expressed support for recreation. The letters of support will allow the Bureau of Reclamation to complete an environmental assessment, which is required for any construction to take place, said the Cathy Metz, Durango’s parks and recreation director.


February 9th

February 8, 2015--Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell announces nearly $20 million for California’s Central Valley for Western Drought Response Project (Sierra Times)

Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell today announced that the Bureau of Reclamation is making $50 million in funds available immediately for drought relief projects throughout the West —including nearly $20 million for California’s Central Valley Project.


February 8, 2015--Water plan must focus on conservation, not diversion (Post Independent)

Until 50 years ago, dams and water diversions were seen by many as symbols of progress, ingenuity and man’s triumph over nature. By 1970 we had built 100,000 dams in rivers and creeks across the country, and their negative impacts — on fish, wildlife, wetlands, recreation and communities — were becoming increasingly visible.


February 7, 2015--Aerial survey shows pine beetles waning, but spruce beetles continue to spread across Colorado forests (Summit Voice)

There’s good news and bad news from Colorado’s forests. Mountain pine beetle activity has faded to the lowest level since 1996, but spruce beetles continue to spread in the San Juans and in northwestern Colorado. The spruce beetle outbreak was detected on 485,000 acres in 2014, compared to 398,000 acres across the state in 2013, according to the U.S.


February 7, 2015--Climate change will increase evaporation of Colorado River (Las Vegas Review-Journal)

The Colorado River faces a dual threat from climate change as rising temperatures increase the demand for irrigation water and accelerate evaporation at the river’s two largest reservoirs. So says a new report from the U.S.


February 7, 2015--AWWA To Congress: Controlling Nntrient pollution key to preventing cyanotoxins in drinking water (Water Online)

In testimony recently before the U.S. House Subcommittee on Environment and the Economy, American Water Works Association Water Utility Council Chair Aurel Arndt stressed that the solution to keeping drinking water safe from cyanotoxins begins with better managing nutrient pollution.


February 6th

February 6, 2015--Water expert: NM is draining water reserves (Albuquerque Journal)

If water were dollars and New Mexico a bank, our checking account would be busted and we’d be dipping dangerously into savings. That’s how Sam Fernald, director of the New Mexico Water Resources Research Institute, thinks about the state’s dire water conditions.