Archive

June 29th, 2015

June 28, 2015--Can cloud-seeding ride to the rescue? (Mountain Town News)

After a so-so winter, the snow piled up through May in the mountains of Colorado, taking the edge off drought. This takes the edge off of the big Colorado River reservoirs, Lake Mead and Lake Powell.


June 27, 2015--World’s aquifers losing replenishment race, researchers say (New York Times)

From the Arabian Peninsula to northern India to California’s Central Valley, nearly a third of the world’s 37 largest aquifers are being drained faster than they are being replenished, according to a recent study led by scientists at the University of California, Irvine.


June 26, 2015--Colorado River shortage requires basin states to work together (Utah Public Radio)

The water level at Lake Mead reached a record low on Wednesday, forcing federal water managers to guide the level back above a crucial drought trigger point. Special interest groups are asking political leaders to work together to find ways to better manage water challenges in the West.


June 26, 2015--Bureau of Reclamation planning recreation work at Lake Nighthorse (Pine River Times)

The U.S. Bureau of Reclamation has plans to build an entrance station and boat decontamination station at Lake Nighthorse, according to Brent Rheese, the bureau's Upper Colorado River regional director, who last week attended a meeting in Durango of the four-state Upper Colorado River Commission.


June 25, 2015--Durango’s water gets refresh (Durango Herald)

The water flowing from city taps should taste a bit better now that the city is phasing in a new treatment process. Rather than using chlorine tablets, the city is using a solution of chlorine and peroxide to purify water at the city’s treatment plant east of Fort Lewis College, said Steve Salka, the city’s utilities director.


June 25, 2015--How a historical blunder helped create the water crisis in the West (NPR)

In 1922, seven Western states — Colorado, Utah, New Mexico, Arizona, Nevada, Wyoming and California — drew up an agreement on how to divide the waters of the Colorado River. But there was one big problem with the plan: They overestimated how much water the river could provide. As a result, each state was promised more water than actually exists.


June 24th

June 24, 2015--Lake Mead sinks to record low, risking water shortage (USA Today)

Lake Mead sunk to a record low Tuesday night, falling below the point that would trigger a water-supply shortage if the reservoir doesn't recover soon. Water managers expect the lake's level to rebound enough to ward off a 2016 shortage thanks to a wetter-than-expected spring. But in the long run, as a U.S.


June 24, 2015--ProPublica investigates Colorado River water woes (Public News Service)

The investigative journalism group ProPublica has been taking an in-depth look at the water crisis in the West, in a series that is focused on the Colorado River. As part of the series Killing the Colorado, reporter Abrahm Lustgarten spent months interviewing people on all sides of the water-use debate, from farmers in Arizona to city leaders in Las Vegas. What he said he's l


June 24, 2015--Water Lines: Colorado water leaders set ambitious conservation goals (grand Junction Press)

Discussions and disputes over how to meet the water needs of Colorado’s growing population typically revolve around the proper balance between taking additional water from agriculture, taking additional water from the West Slope to the Front Range, and conservation. Conservation would seem to be the low-hanging fruit, but the nuts and bolts of how to conserve enough to avoid more tra


June 23, 2015--Bennet-backed rural water bill passes Senate (High Plains Journal)

Colorado U.S. Sen. Michael Bennet recently praised passage of the Grassroots Rural and Small Community Water Systems Act by the Senate. The bill—which passed unanimously—would help small and rural communities comply with safe drinking water regulations. Bennet helped introduce the bill earlier this year with Sens.