California

March 22, 2015--Will California's drought affect hydroelectric power? (Christian Science Monitor)

For California, now in its fourth year of drought, the record low snowfall, in addition to the lack of rain, is beginning to hamper the state’s supply of hydroelectric energy. This winter California received only 12 percent of its average snowpack, meaning that there will be dramatically less runoff into the rivers and dams across the Sierra Nevada this spring. “We&#3


March 21, 2015--With epic drought, is it time for a national water policy? (USA Today)

More than half the United States is experiencing some form of drought. California is in emergency status, left with a year's worth of water in its reservoirs to service its population.


March 20, 2015--No, California won't run out of water in a year (Los Angeles Times)

California's water situation is troubling, but experts say decades worth of groundwater remain. Lawmakers are proposing emergency legislation, state officials are clamping down on watering lawns and, as California enters a fourth year of drought, some are worried that the state could run out of water. State water managers and other experts said Thursda

March 19, 2015--Jerry Brown seeks $1-billion emergency drought relief plan for California (Los Angeles Times)

For a second time in two years, Gov. Jerry Brown and lawmakers push emergency drought relief. As California braces for a fourth consecutive year of drought, Gov. Jerry Brown and legislative leaders on Thursday will unveil a $1-billion relief plan, two sources told The Times late Wednesday.

March 18, 2015--As California sets new water restrictions, Arizona resources dwindle (Arizona Public Media)

On Tuesday, California officials passed tough new restrictions on water usage in urban areas. The State Water Resources Control Board of California passed new restrictions on urban water agencies that, among other things, limits landscape watering to two days a week in cities that don't already have restrictions in place. With longterm drought forecast across the West, s


March 18, 2015--Overpumping of Central Valley groundwater creating a crisis, experts say (Los Angeles Times)

A simple instrument with a weight and a pulley confirmed what hydrologist Michelle Sneed had suspected after seeing more and more dirt vanish from the base of her equipment each time she returned to her research site last summer. The tawny San Joaquin Valley earth was sinking a half-inch each month. The reason was no mystery.


March 17, 2015--Snowpack is declining in valleys where Colorado River originates, water watchers say (Associated Press)

Snowpack in the mountains and valleys where the Colorado River originates has been shrinking since the beginning of March, a federal water expert said Tuesday. The snow ranged between 89 and 91 percent of the long-term average, depending on which measurement is used. "We dried out relatively significantly here since the beginning of March," said Brian Domonkos, supervisor of


March 17, 2015--California water anxiety syndrome: Feel it yet? (San Francisco Chronical)

The feeling is inescapable, palpable, more than a little scary. I’m talking about California Water Anxiety Syndrome (CWAS), of course, that sinking feeling to trump all sinking feelings, that sour knot in the pit of the collective stomach, unnerving and strange and, let’s just admit, unutterably depressing. California, as you might have heard, is running out of water.


March 13, 2015--As drought worsens, L.A. water agency offers cash to Sacramento Valley farmers (Sacramento Bee)

With the drought stretching into its fourth year, a heavyweight water agency from Los Angeles has come calling on Sacramento Valley rice farmers, offering up to $71 million for some of their water. The price being offered is so high, some farmers can make more from selling water than from growing their rice.


March 4, 2015--California drought visualization website (GISuser.com)

This visualization tool is designed to provide the public with atlas-like, statewide coverage of the drought and a timeline of its impacts on water resources. In partnership with the Bureau of Reclamation, options are being explored to expand the visualization to describe conditions across the lower Colorado River region.


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