California

September 1, 2015--A national water grid: It's time! (Huffington Post)

California is in the fourth year of a very serious drought. Water restrictions are being imposed. Agriculture is being significantly affected, which will result in rising prices across the United States for vegetables, fruits, nuts, and so forth.


August 2, 2015--Hydro-powered irrigation: Colorado makes water work (Earth Techling)

Much of the west coast’s water comes from the Colorado river, which, as its name suggests, originates high in the Rocky Mountains of Colorado. The current drought is most severe at the end of the line in Nevada and California, but Colorado is also drying out. Restrictions on residential water use are helping, but can only do so much.


July 22, 2015--California’s big groundwater problem (New York Times)

California struggles to measure how much water its heaviest users draw from its rivers and streams.


July 15, 2015--Is water on the way to becoming 'clear gold' in California? (Los Angeles Times)

Water may soon become more valuable than oil. That's the punch line of today's cartoon, which responds to the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power's proposal to raise revenue, to fix its crumbling infrastructure and encourage conservation during the ongoing California drought.


July 10, 2015--It's about to get easier for California farmers to conserve water—and sell it (CityLab)

There’s no “solving” California’s drought, as so many headlines suggest. Drought is a regular feature of the Western climate cycle.


July 6, 2015--California’s rural poor hit hardest as groundwater vanishes in long drought (Washington Post)

Whenever her sons rush indoors after playing under the broiling desert sun, Guadalupe Rosales worries. They rarely heed her constant warning: Don’t drink the water. It’s not safe. The 8- and 10-year-olds stick their mouths under a kitchen faucet and gulp anyway. There is arsenic in the groundwater feeding their community well at St.


July 5, 2015--California drought sends U.S. water agency back to drawing board (New York Times)

Drew Lessard stood on top of Folsom Dam and gazed at the Sierra Nevada, which in late spring usually gushes enough melting snow into the reservoir to provide water for a million people. But the mountains were bare, and the snowpack to date remains the lowest on measured record. “If there’s no snowpack, there’s no water,” said Mr.


July 2, 2015--Beyond the perfect drought: California’s real water crisis (Environment 360)

The current drought afflicting California is indeed historic, but not because of the low precipitation totals. In fact, in terms of overall precipitation and spring snowpack, the past three years are not record-breakers, according to weather data for the past century.


California Water Rights Exceed Supply

Among other serious water challenges, UC Davis researchers have found that in the last century, California has handed out rights to five times more surface water than their rivers produce even in a normal year. On some major river systems (i.e., the San Joaquin Valley), people have rights to nearly nine times more water than flows from the Sierra mountains.


Water Conservation Nullified by Growth

According to an early April Water Online article, while California residents are trying to conserve water, it may do little good in the face of population growth. California water agencies are on track to satisfy a state mandate to reduce water consumption 20 percent by 2020, but according to their own projections, that savings won’t be enough to keep up with population growth just a decade later.


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