California

May 23, 2015--The winners and the losers of the California water crisis (Science Daily)

A recent article published in Local Environment highlights the widening gap of inequality between the wealthy and the poor of California, specifically in relation to the State's current drought. The authors, Stephanie Pincetl and Terri Hogue, discuss what has caused these inequalities to expand -- the outdated and unsupervised water regulations still currently used,


May 21, 2015--California farmers offer concession in drought (New York Times)

Faced with the increasing likelihood that the state will significantly cut their water allotment as a way to deal with the punishing drought, farmers in California’s Sacramento and San Joaquin river delta are offering to give up a quarter of the water they have considered guaranteed for more than a century.


May 20, 2015--Millions in federal dollars aim to improve long-term water conservation (Los Angeles Times)

California is getting about $33 million in federal money for water recycling, irrigation improvements and other conservation projects in a new round of funding for water and energy efficiency projects in Western states. Few of the California projects, which are spread across the state, would provide immediate relief from the lingering drought.


May 17, 2015--The greatest water crisis in the history of the United States (Right Side News)

What are we going to do once all the water is gone?  Thanks to the worst drought in more than 1,000 years, the western third of the country is facing the greatest water crisis that the United States has ever seen. Lake Mead is now the lowest that it has ever been since the Hoover Dam was finished in the 1930s, mandatory water restrictions have already been implemented in the state of


May 16, 2015--Drought cuts power production of California dams (Los Angeles Times)

Shasta Dam, looming more than 600 feet tall and gatekeeper of the largest man-made lake in California, was designed to perform two crucial functions: Store water and generate power. And for decades, the massive concrete structure has channeled water to cities and farms while generating up to 710 megawatts of hydropower, enough to provide electricity for more than 532,000 homes.


May 16, 2015--L.A. getting no Owens Valley runoff for first time since 1913 (Los Angeles Times)

For the first time since 1913 -- when Department of Water and Power chief architect William Mulholland opened the waterway with the words, "There it is. Take it!" -- the 233-mile Los Angeles Aqueduct has stopped carrying Owens Valley runoff to Los Angeles.


May 13, 2015--Colorado River water shortage looms (U-T San Diego)

California’s drought emergency woes have worsened, with a shortage on the Colorado River next year becoming increasingly likely. Odds of a shortage rose from 33 percent to 50 percent from April 1 to May 1, Metropolitan Water District, Southern California’s largest water wholesaler, said Monday.


May 8, 2015--California wildfire concerns rise after drought kills 12.5m trees (Guardian)

An astonishing 12.5m trees have died in California, unable to survive a harsh fourth year of drought, according to a US government study. The news of the massive tree die-offs came this week, after the United States Forest Service, a Department of Agriculture agency, released the results of an aerial survey it undertook in April over 8.2m acres of forest.


April 30, 2015--$8bn habitat conservation plan scrapped as California prioritises agribusiness (Guardian)

For the past eight years, California politicians, utility companies, farmers and environmentalists have been arguing over the Bay Delta Conservation Plan (BDCP). Environmental groups are now speaking out after recent announcements that the conservation part of the plan has been shelved.


April 18, 2015--Drought is not just a California problem (USA Today)

With all the attention focused on California's water woes, an observer might conclude that the Golden State's drought is the exception. It isn't. Forty states expect to see water shortages in at least some areas in the next decade, according to a government watchdog agency.


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