McElmo Flume

August 27, 2016--Historic McElmo flume awarded final funding (Cortez Journal)

The historic McElmo Flume is set to get a final makeover thanks to a $180,000 grant awarded this month to Montezuma County from the Colorado State Historical Society. “It is the last piece of the preservation process that will tell the story of water history in the county,” said flume advocate Linda Towle. A recently constructed interpretive pullout off U.S.


McElmo Flume

Flumes are a method to divert water to a desired location. In contrast to a ditch or trench, a flume is man-made channel for water, in the form of an open declined gravity chute whose walls are raised above the surrounding terrain. Most flumes were wooden troughs elevated on trestles, often following the natural contours of the land. In 1878 a ditch company was formed in Montezuma Valley for the purpose of diverting water from the Dolores River for agricultural irrigation purposes. Canals were dug and flumes were built, and by 1889 the project was complete. In April of 1888, the Montezuma Journal called the system, “…one of the greatest irrigation enterprises, not only in the state, but in the West.”


June 6, 2014--McElmo Flume secures funding for stabilization (Cortez Journal)

It has been a long road, and there is still a ways to go, but the first step toward bringing the remaining section of the McElmo Flume back to life has a green light. The last piece of the puzzle for the initial stabilization phase of the project fell into place this week said Linda Towle, chairwoman of the Cortez Historic Preservation board.


January 2, 2014--Water board chips in for McElmo Flume (Cortez Journal)

The McElmo Flume restoration project gained some traction recently when the Southwestern Water Conservation District board agreed to contribute $15,000 in matching funds pending approval of a grant. Montezuma County has applied for a $122,700 grant from the Colorado State Historic Fund to repair the flume’s foundation.


Syndicate content