National Water Policy

March 21, 2015--With epic drought, is it time for a national water policy? (USA Today)

More than half the United States is experiencing some form of drought. California is in emergency status, left with a year's worth of water in its reservoirs to service its population.

January 14, 2015--Now is the time for national water resource policy (Huff Post)

Water is our most precious natural resource and, yet, we abuse it and fail to effectively manage it. The Center for Neighborhood Technology, a not-for-profit organization based in Chicago that focuses on sustainable cities, estimates that the loss of water from our municipal distribution systems approaches 2.1 trillion gallons per year.

National Water Policy?

American water policy has long been the subject of scholarly criticisms. The fractured nature of U.S. water policy has been criticized for decades. In an effort to address some of these concerns, countless commissions, councils, and studies have been established and conducted. All have called for new directions in water policy and better planning, evaluation, and coordination. Over the decades, concerns about water supply and development continue to mount. These concerns consistently point to the need to establish a national water commission to assess future water demands, study current management programs, and develop recommendations for a comprehensive strategy. Some researchers view the fragmented nature of water policy as being based on attitudes and perceptions about water in general and that prolonged water shortages and droughts may be a catalyst to change attitudes. In other words, when physical limits of water are reached, the political arena will change. Perhaps the catalyst to change attitudes has arrived.

June 18, 2014--Bad water policies (Aguanomics)

Here -- for your future reference -- are a few popular policies and their drawbacks: A national water strategy is usually inappropriate because it's at the wrong governance scale. The largest useful scale for governance is a watershed or catchment, which may cross national or political boundaries.

June 13, 2013--Satellite data will be essential to future of groundwater, flood and drought management (Science Daily)

New satellite imagery reveals that several areas across the United States are all but certain to suffer water-related catastrophes, including extreme flooding, drought and groundwater depletion. The paper, to be published in Science this Friday, June 14, underscores the urgent need to address these current and rapidly emerging water issues at the national scale.

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