Use it or Lose it

September 6, 2016--Colorado’s water engineer discusses wasting of state’s precious resource (Aspen Daily Times)

Dick Wolfe, Colorado’s state water engineer, told a group of irrigators here last week that it’s illegal for someone to take more water than they need because they are speculating on the future potential value of their water rights. Wolfe was one of several guest speakers at the Uncompahgre Valley Water Forum, which was held on Sept.


July 3, 2016--Vail Daily column: Use it or lose it? (Vail Daily)

The “use it or lose it” feature of Colorado water law is often blamed for discouraging farmers and ranchers from taking efficiency and conservation measures that could benefit the environment or ease the supply and demand imbalance on the Colorado River.


June 3, 2016--Colorado water law doesn't discourage efficiency (Post Independent)

The “use it or lose it” feature of Colorado water law is often blamed for discouraging farmers and ranchers from taking efficiency and conservation measures that could benefit the environment or ease the supply/demand imbalance on the Colorado River.


February 5, 2016--The right to waste water: In the west, water users forced to use it or lose it (Pro Publica)

High in the Rocky Mountains, snowmelt fills a stream that trickles down into Ohio Creek and then onward toward the Upper Gunnison River.


June 16, 2015--Colorado cuts into use-or-lose system that caused water waste (Denver Post)

Colorado water rights owners are forging a way out of the state's ingrained "Use It Or Lose It" rule that penalizes those who divert less than their full allotment from rivers — opening a path to cut water use as shortages grip the West. For 139 years, state enforcers have said farmers, cities and ranchers who don't use all the water they are entitled to could have


June 9, 2015--Use It or lose it: Across the West, exercising one’s right to waste water (ProPublica)

There are few starker examples of how man’s missteps and policies are contributing to the water shortage currently afflicting the western United States. In a series of reports, ProPublica is examining how decisions on water management and growth have exacerbated more than a decade of drought, bringing the West to the point of crisis.


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