Water Monitoring

March 17, 2016--The water data drought (New York Times)

As a nation, we have become disciples of data. We interview 60,000 families a month to determine the unemployment rate, we monitor how much energy we use every seven days, Amazon ranks sales of every book it sells every hour. Then there is water. Water may be the most important item in our lives, our economy and our landscape about which we know the least.


July 29, 2014--Controlling water quality in the age of pollution and natural disasters (Phys.org)

Two years ago, Hurricane Sandy damaged more than 100 drinking water supply facilities and sewage treatment plants, leaving the state of New York, with an unexpected $2 billion bill to repair them. On the other side of the globe, drinking water even kilometres from the Fukushima power plant in Japan still is, today, a life gamble.


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