Central Arizona Project

October 12, 2014--U.S. Bureau of Reclamation - Basin municipalities and federal government take action to protect the Colorado River (YNN)

 Faced with the increasing probability of shortage on the Colorado River, municipal water providers in Arizona, California, Nevada and Colorado, and the Bureau of Reclamation are implementing a landmark Colorado River System Conservation program. Reclamation is soliciting water conservation project proposals from Colorado River entitlement holders in Arizona, California, and Nevada.


October 8, 2014--Colorado River water-conservation effort to begin (Las Vegas Sun)

The U.S. Bureau of Reclamation on Wednesday began soliciting project proposals for water conservation from Colorado River entitlement holders in Arizona, California and Nevada. Water users in the river's Upper Basin will be invited to participate in the agreement at a later date.


‘Big Boys’ Reach Landmark Water Conservation Agreement

In August, the Central Arizona Project, Denver Water, the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California, and Southern Nevada Water Authority all signed on to what is being called a landmark water conservation agreement aimed at demonstrating “the viability of cooperative, voluntary compensated measures,” according to a press release from Denver Water. With Colorado River water supplies dwindling, these organizations--the biggest water users at the table--said they’ll invest $11 million to try and conserve significant amounts of water across all sectors, including agricultural, municipal, and industrial uses.

August 5, 2014--To protect hydropower, utilities will pay Colorado River water users to conserve (High Country News)

Here’s a sure sign that your region’s in drought: you stop paying your utility for the privilege of using water, and the utility starts paying you not to use water instead. Outlandish as it sounds, that’s what four major Western utilities and the federal government are planning to do next year through the $11 million Colorado River Conservation Partnership.


August 3, 2014--Western water suppliers reach Colorado River conservation agreement (Summit Daily)

Denver Water joined forces last week with water providers in Arizona, California and Nevada and the federal government to sign a water conservation agreement. The Colorado River System Conservation program is an effort to address a long-term imbalance on the Colorado River caused by years of drought and water demands that exceed supply.


July 31, 2014--Major Colorado River players announce conservation push (Summit Voice)

With Colorado River water supplies disappearing at a dizzying rate, and with a thirsty — and politically mighty — California parched by drought, the biggest water users at the table said this week they’ll invest $11 million to try and conserve significant amounts of water across all sectors, including including agricultural, municipal and industrial uses.


July 28, 2014--Water and economic value for Arizona (Havasu News)

Central Arizona Project (CAP) is the primary steward of central and southern Arizona's Colorado River water resources. By delivering almost 500 billion gallons of Colorado River water every year, CAP has dramatically and positively changed the economic and environmental landscape of our state.


July 19, 2014--Water rationing for farmers? It's on the horizon (Arizona Central)

Regional water planners last month made a prediction that will likely be a game-changer for Arizona's economy, revealing just how water scarcity will restructure the future of our food security. As early as 2017, drought in the Lower Colorado River's watershed could lead to irrigation rationing for central Arizona agriculture.


July 8, 2014--Lake Mead edges closer to historic low level, raising river concerns (Rocky Mountain PBS)

Lake Mead. The white ring "around the tub" shows how much elevation the surface of the lake has lost. Lake Mead, the vast reservoir behind historic Hoover Dam outside Las Vegas, is flirting with historic low levels. And that doesn’t bode well for any of the seven states (or Mexico) that share Colorado River water.


June 26, 2014--Arizona cities look proactively in dealing with drought, dipping river level (Bloomberg)

As the drought in the West and overuse of Colorado River water continue, officials of Arizona's two largest cities are launching a new strategy aimed at countering the anticipated impacts of drought and long-term climate change. Instead of working separately to secure water, Phoenix and Tucson say they are working collaboratively.


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