Climate Change

EPA Releases “Being Prepared for Climate Change: A Workbook for Developing Risk-Based Adaptation Plans”

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Climate Ready Estuaries program has published Being Prepared for Climate Change: A Workbook for Developing Risk-Based Adaptation Plans as a resource for environmental managers and planners.

April 20, 2015--'One water' can solve many supply problems (Green Biz)

Why do we make a water shortage worse by carving it into separate problems? Current events in California are drawing attention to the current and projected gap between water supply and demand projections.

April 18, 2015--Climate study foresees fewer year-round streams (Post Independent)

Some year-round streams could become intermittent as global climate change takes a toll on the Upper Colorado River basin, according to a recent study. “Modeled intermittency risk for small streams in the Upper Colorado River Basin under climate change,” written by Lindsay V. Reynolds, Patrick B.


April 16, 2015--The Arctic is ‘unraveling’ due to global warming, and the consequences will be global (Washington Post)

We often hear that climate change is radically reshaping the Arctic, a place many of us have never visited. As a result, it can be pretty hard to feel directly affected by what’s happening up in a distant land of polar bears, ice floes and something odd called permafrost.


April 15, 2015--Study says global warming will bring drought to western U.S. sooner rather than later (Summit Voice)

The western U.S. will likely be one of the first places to experience unprecedented drought driven by climate change, according to new research by scientists with the Vienna-based International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis.


April 12, 2015--In California, rights to water exceed the supply (Los Angeles Times)

It's arguable whether California has enough water to meet its actual needs. But it clearly does not have enough to match people's expectations. And one reason is simple. Government historically has over-promised — not exactly a new concept. In the last century, the state has handed out rights to five times more surface water than our rivers produce even in a normal year.


Study: Warming Pushes Western US Toward Driest Period in 1,000 Years

During the second half of the 21st century, the U.S. Southwest and Great Plains will face unprecedented, persistent drought worse than anything seen in times ancient or modern, with the drying conditions driven primarily by human-induced global warming. The finding were part of a new study, "Unprecedented 21st-Century Drought Risk in the American Southwest and Central Plains," featured in the inaugural edition of the new online journal Science Advances, produced by the American Association for the Advancement of Science, which also publishes the leading journal Science. The research indicated that the drying would surpass in severity any of the decades-long mega-droughts that occurred much earlier during the past 1,000 years--one of which has been tied by some researchers to the decline of the Anasazi or Ancient Pueblo Peoples in the Colorado Plateau in the late 13th century. Many studies have already predicted that the Southwest could dry due to global warming, but this is the first to say that such drying could exceed the worst conditions of the distant past. "The 21st century projections make the mega-droughts seem like quaint walks through the Garden of Eden," said Jason Smerdon, a co-author and climate scientist at the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, part of the Earth Institute at Columbia University.


Report: Colorado River Water Evaporation Increases Due to Climate Change

A new report from the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation predicted an 8 percent increase in irrigation demand on the lower half of the Colorado River Basin and a 10 percent increase in evaporation from Lake Mead by 2080. The upper half of the Basin, above Glen Canyon Dam in Arizona, is expected to see demand for agricultural water jump by almost 23 percent, while Lake Powell loses 7 percent more water to evaporation than it did during the last half of the 20th century. The estimates are based on a projected temperature increase of about 5 degrees across the region.


April 3, 2015--Drought is just the start of California climate woes, says report backed by business heavyweights (Sacramento Business Journal)

California's coastal properties, water supplies, agricultural heartland and overall economy could take huge hits by 2050, and bigger ones later, unless we take "immediate action," warns a report backed by Tom Steyer, Henry Cisneros, Hank Paulson and Michael Bloomberg, among other business and policy honchos.


April 3, 2015--Hydropower could be risky bet in warming world (Climate Central)

As investments in wind and solar power climb, backing major hydropower projects may be seen as a risky bet in a warming world, as studies show that reservoirs may be major sources of methane emissions and climate change itself could make rain and snowfall less certain in some regions.


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