Climate Change

EPA Releases “Being Prepared for Climate Change: A Workbook for Developing Risk-Based Adaptation Plans”

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Climate Ready Estuaries program has published Being Prepared for Climate Change: A Workbook for Developing Risk-Based Adaptation Plans as a resource for environmental managers and planners.

March 2, 2015--A Colorado River diminished by climate change impacts all of the Southwest, urban and rural alike (Arizona Central)

The most dire prediction of a 2012 federal supply-and-demand study of the Colorado River may have been this one: By 2060, the demand shortfall for Colorado River water could reach 1 trillion gallons — enough water to supply 6 million Southwestern households for a year. So, which 6 million households do we let go dry? Think this one through.


February 28, 2015--Water is eating away at Antarctica's ice and it may reshape Earth (Associated Press)

Water is eating away at the Antarctic ice, melting it where it hits the oceans. As the ice sheets slowly thaw, water pours into the sea — 130 billion tons of ice (118 billion metric tons) per year for the past decade, according to NASA satellite calculations.


February 25, 2015--New hope for beetle-killed landscapes (High Country News)

From the air, they look like brittle, dead landscapes: millions of acres of scratchy brown pipe cleaners and toothpick logs. Since the 1990s, naturally-occurring bark beetles have multiplied under the effects of drought, climate change and fire-repressed forests, leading to outbreaks that have ravaged forests and left land managers scrambling to deal with a glut of dead trees.


February 24, 2015--Will Utah be ready for a drier, hotter climate? (Salt Lake Tribune)

The specter of drought hanging over the Southwest is already pretty dire, with forests drying out into beetle-killed tinderboxes and reservoir levels plunging. But the current dry spell may barely register in comparison with what has happened in the distant past and could happen in the near future, according to research released this month. And we may have ourselves to blame.


February 22, 2015--Wheat experts warn on global warming impacts (Summit Voice)

Scientists in the biggest wheat-producing state in the U.S. issued a stark climate change warning last week, saying that 25 percent of the world’s wheat production will be lost to extreme weather if no adaptive measures are taken.


February 18, 2015--California water becomes scarce and energy hungry (Climate Central)

In drought-stricken California, ensuring water flows from faucets is nearly as much about energy as it is about the water’s source. Water needs more than gravity to flow from its sources, often hundreds of miles away.


February 16, 2015--Scientists look at role of wetlands in battle against climate change (Phys.org)

The role rainforests play through storing carbon in the battle against climate change is well understood, but Deakin University scientists now believe the humble swamp, or freshwater wetland, could be up to 50 times more effective.


February 16, 2015--Nasa climate study warns of unprecedented North American drought (Guardian)

California is in the midst of its worst drought in over 1,200 years, exacerbated by record hot temperatures. A new study led by Benjamin Cook at Nasa GISS examines how drought intensity in North America will change in a hotter world, and finds that things will only get worse. Global warming intensifies drought in several ways. In increases evaporation from soil and reservoirs.


February 13, 2015--Return of the Dust Bowl? Climate change study highlights how West must adapt (Christian Science Monitor)

A prolonged period of Dust Bowl-like conditions in the second half of this century could severely test strides made toward conserving scarce water supplies in the Western United States and central Plains, according to a new study.


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