Colorado River

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March 2, 2015--A Colorado River diminished by climate change impacts all of the Southwest, urban and rural alike (Arizona Central)

The most dire prediction of a 2012 federal supply-and-demand study of the Colorado River may have been this one: By 2060, the demand shortfall for Colorado River water could reach 1 trillion gallons — enough water to supply 6 million Southwestern households for a year. So, which 6 million households do we let go dry? Think this one through.


March 1, 2015--Talented people are competing for $100,000 to help solve an intractable problem (Arizona Central)

The drought is deepening across the Western United States and our lifeline has grown more tenuous. The Colorado River that feeds Arizona and her neighboring states may not be a reliable supplier of water if today's dry conditions persist.


February 27, 2015--Top official delivers bleak forecast for Lake Mead (Las Vegas Review Journal)

Nevada faces “significant possibilities” of water shortages if drought on the Colorado River persists into the next two years, according to an ominous forecast delivered Wednesday by a top government official.


February 25, 2015--Wetlands loss greater than any other ecosystem (Tucson News Now)

A wetland is land that is covered/saturated with water, permanently or seasonally. It usually has plants and animals not seen anywhere else that require a lot of water with areas of land as well. This ecosystem is vital to earth but is diminishing at an alarming rate. According to WWF's Living Planet Report 64 percent of wetlands have disappeared since the year 1900.


February 19, 2015--In S.W. Colo., snowpack slips (Durango Herald)

Snowpack in Southwest Colorado is perilously low, averaging only 56 percent in an index of the San Miguel, Dolores, Animas and San Juan River basins on Wednesday. The basin index measures snowpack at U.S. Department of Agriculture sites around the region. The snowpack at the summit of Wolf Creek Pass was at only 46 percent of the median figure for the date.


February 18, 2015--California water becomes scarce and energy hungry (Climate Central)

In drought-stricken California, ensuring water flows from faucets is nearly as much about energy as it is about the water’s source. Water needs more than gravity to flow from its sources, often hundreds of miles away.


February 17, 2015--Expert: Overpopulation and city expansion likely cause of future Colorado River Basin water shortages (Grand Canyon News)

Experts say conservation efforts like not watering lawns, taking shorter showers, turning off faucets and not washing your vehicle are not going to help in a long-term solution for water shortages along the Colorado River Basin.


February 12, 2015--Lake Powell and the Colorado River Basin’s disappearing 2015 water (Ink Stain)

The Colorado Basin’s two primary reservoirs lost, on paper, a million acre feet of water because of January’s dry snowpack, according to the latest numbers from the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation. That’s the difference between what we expected to end the current water year with based on the January forecast, versus what the forecast looks like today, a month later.


February 1, 2015--Water managers bracing for another dry year in NM (Albuquerque Journal)

For the fourth consecutive year, New Mexico water users are watching a skimpy snowpack in the state’s northern mountains and worrying about how much water they will have this spring and summer. On the state’s largest rivers – the Pecos, the Rio Grande and the San Juan – the thin covering of mountain snow means less water in early forecasts.


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