Colorado River

***Help Save the Colorado River: Pledge Now to the Change the Course Campaign!***

The freshwater team at National Geographic believes the principle of motivated individual action can help to restore the flow of the Colorado River.  Together with the Bonneville Environment Foundation and Participant Media, National Geographic has created the “Change the Course” campaign.


March 23, 2015--Innovative thinking spurs water deal (Arizona Central)

As part of a deal approved by the Arizona Corporation Commission, the private company, Liberty Utilities, will recharge about 78 billion gallons of treated effluent into the West Valley's aquifer.


March 18, 2015--As California sets new water restrictions, Arizona resources dwindle (Arizona Public Media)

On Tuesday, California officials passed tough new restrictions on water usage in urban areas. The State Water Resources Control Board of California passed new restrictions on urban water agencies that, among other things, limits landscape watering to two days a week in cities that don't already have restrictions in place. With longterm drought forecast across the West, s


March 17, 2015--Snowpack is declining in valleys where Colorado River originates, water watchers say (Associated Press)

Snowpack in the mountains and valleys where the Colorado River originates has been shrinking since the beginning of March, a federal water expert said Tuesday. The snow ranged between 89 and 91 percent of the long-term average, depending on which measurement is used. "We dried out relatively significantly here since the beginning of March," said Brian Domonkos, supervisor of


March 13, 2015--Forecasters predict another down year for Lake Mead (Las Vegas Review-Journal)

A lackluster year so far on the Colorado River has local water managers and National Park Service officials bracing for further declines at Lake Mead. According to the latest federal forecast, released Wednesday, the reservoir is expected to fall to a new record low next month and slip downward from there, shedding a total of about 20 feet through June 2016. The bleak new estimat


March 11, 2015--CWCB proposed acquisition of contractual interest in water on the 15 mile reach of the Colorado River (CWCB Instream Flow Program)

At its March 18-19, 2015 meeting in Broomfield, CO, the Colorado Water Conservation Board (“CWCB”) will evaluate a proposal from the Ute Water Conservancy District for a potential lease of a contractual interest in water for instream flow use to preserve/improve the natural environment to a reasonable degree in the Colorado River. The reach of stream proposed for use


March 9, 2015--Can climate action plans combat megadrought and save the Colorado River? (Eco Watch)

Two of the largest reservoirs in the U.S.—Lakes Mead and Powell along the Colorado River—continue to lose water and are now less than half full with no prediction that the trend will change direction. The U.S.


March 4, 2015--California drought visualization website (GISuser.com)

This visualization tool is designed to provide the public with atlas-like, statewide coverage of the drought and a timeline of its impacts on water resources. In partnership with the Bureau of Reclamation, options are being explored to expand the visualization to describe conditions across the lower Colorado River region.


March 2, 2015--A Colorado River diminished by climate change impacts all of the Southwest, urban and rural alike (Arizona Central)

The most dire prediction of a 2012 federal supply-and-demand study of the Colorado River may have been this one: By 2060, the demand shortfall for Colorado River water could reach 1 trillion gallons — enough water to supply 6 million Southwestern households for a year. So, which 6 million households do we let go dry? Think this one through.


March 1, 2015--Talented people are competing for $100,000 to help solve an intractable problem (Arizona Central)

The drought is deepening across the Western United States and our lifeline has grown more tenuous. The Colorado River that feeds Arizona and her neighboring states may not be a reliable supplier of water if today's dry conditions persist.


Syndicate content