Colorado River Basin

December 2, 2015--U.S. Geological Survey national water census: Colorado River Basin geographic focus area study (USGS)

The U.S. Geological Survey’s (USGS) concept of a national census (or accounting) of water resources has evolved over the last several decades as the Nation has experienced increasing concern over water availability for multiple competing uses.


July 11, 2015--Interactive map: Indian water rights in the Colorado River Basin (Circle of Blue)

With the oldest claims to water, Native American tribes in the Colorado River Basin command a considerable role in directing the region’s future. Combined, the tribes hold rights to a substantial portion of the Colorado River’s flow: roughly 20 percent, or 2.9 million acre-feet, which is more water than Arizona’s allocation from the river.


June 4, 2015--Colorado River Basin in crisis (Moab Sun News)

The consumptive use of surface water in the Colorado River Basin is currently over-extended and we know this because we can see the “bathtub ring” with our own eyes when we visit Lake Powell, and especially Lake Mead.


Colorado River Basin: Energy Production in Times of Drought and Effects on Prices

The Colorado River Basin has been experiencing below average river flows for 11 of the last 14 years. In response, water officials are planning for the potential that continued drought conditions could leave too little water to generate electricity.


September 27, 2014--3 ways to save Arizona's water supply (Arizona Central)

We are benefiting now from past strong water planning and leadership. Today we need more creative thinking and action to avoid water shortages that will come. Demand for water in the seven-state Colorado River basin now exceeds supply. Much of the water actually leaves the Colorado basin to places like Denver, Los Angeles, San Diego and Salt Lake City. The drought only makes it worse.


September 19, 2014--Western U.S. governors begin drought discussions (Circle of Blue)

In the midst of a record-smashing dry cycle in the United States, the organization with the most influence over state and federal drought policy wants to do a better job managing the crisis. The need is evident. New research indicates that current state drought plans are inadequate for the task.


July 27, 2014--How Southern Nevada could turn water deficiency into economic boon (Las Vegas Sun)

On a ribbon of road two miles beyond Henderson, at the base of the mountains leading to Lake Mead, scientists peer through microscopes searching samples of water for microbes and chemicals. They’re looking for new ways to clean and conserve water. In the process, they’re also helping to spawn an industry to power Las Vegas’ economy.


July 25, 2014--Groundwater levels drop in Southwestern U.S. in ongoing drought (Reuters)

Underground stores of water in the southwestern United States have receded dramatically amid ongoing drought that has parched states from Oklahoma to the Pacific Coast and is costing California billions in lost crops and jobs, a new study shows.


July 24, 2014--Serious water losses identified in Colorado Basin (Nature World News)

The Colorado River basin is drying up. According to data recently released by NASA, the basin has lost nearly 53 million acre feet of freshwater since 2004, taking away far more water than the region can hope to refill.


July 24, 2014--In Colorado River Basin, groundwater is disappearing much faster than Lake Mead (Circle of Blue)

The mineral-stained canyon walls and the plunging water levels at Lake Mead, the nation’s largest reservoir, are the most visible signs of the driest 14-year period in the Colorado River Basin’s historical record.


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