Colorado

May 15, 2015--Southwest reservoirs play catch-up (Durango Herald)

Colorado is slogging through a wetter-than-normal spring, with heavy rain restoring much-needed moisture to parched rangeland and sending some rivers over the banks. But the precipitation isn’t helping dry downstream states in the Southwest that rely on the Colorado River, which originates in western Colorado. The U.S.


May 14, 2015--Colorado begins $3.4 million effort to save ag water, use it to make power (Denver Post)

Colorado is embarking on a federally backed $3.4 million experiment to transform the flood irrigation farmers use to grow crops: tapping diverted water more efficiently and generating electricity. Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack kicked off the "small hydropower" project Monday in Denver and announced $235 million in new federal grants nationwide to spur innovation around water,


May 14, 2015--Gov. Hickenlooper signs bill to fight invasive, thirsty plants (KVNF)

House Bill 1006 creates the Invasive Phreatophyte Grant Program. Governor John Hickenlooper signed the bill at a ceremony in Montrose on Tuesday. "Phreatophytes are those trees and bushes...like Russian olive or tamarisk that just suck up water," said Hickenlooper.


May 8, 2015--Dolores River conservation group has successful 2014 (Telluride Daily Planet)

In a presentation to the San Miguel County Board of Commissioners at their meeting Wednesday, Nature Conservancy Southwest Colorado Project Director Peter Mueller updated the board on the work of the Dolores River Restoration Partnership, a private-public partnership that works to preserve the wildlife and ecology of the river that starts in the San Juan Mountains and runs to its confluence wit


May 7, 2015--Water attorney tapped for river study (Cortez Journal)

The phrase “implied water rights” for special designations on federal lands sent chills down the spines of local irrigators at a meeting discussing the legal ramifications on their potential below McPhee dam.


May 6, 2015--Colorado measure to allow rooftop rain barrels fails (9 News)

Colorado's only-in-the-nation ban on backyard rain barrels is sticking around for another year. The state Senate moved Tuesday to reject a bill to allow homeowners to use up to two 55-gallon rain barrels. The maneuver was a late-evening vote to delay the bill, meaning it won't make it to the governor's desk before lawmakers conclude work for the year.


May 5, 2015--Colorado begins $3.4 million effort to save ag water, use it to make power (Denver Post)

Colorado is embarking on a federally backed $3.4 million experiment to transform the flood irrigation farmers use to grow crops: tapping diverted water more efficiently and generating electricity.


May 4, 2015--Colorado Water: State agency into buying water to leave in rivers (Aspen Times)

Just one state agency has a mission that includes paying people to leave water in Colorado’s rivers for environmental reasons — and that can legally protect the flowing water — and that’s the Colorado Water Conservation Board, or CWCB.


May 3, 2015--Rain-barrel measure could wash away in Colo. (Durango Herald)

A measure that would allow Coloradans to collect and store rainwater that falls on their roofs has hit a storm and could drown. Supporters say the bill has been held hostage by the Republican chairman of the Senate Agriculture, Livestock and Natural Resources Committee, who very publicly loathes even the concept of the legislation.


May 1, 2015--A draft of Colorado’s proposed water plan may not be trickling down to the people? (Colorado Independent)

Water fights run deep in this state, and officials long avoided drafting a plan for what to do about it. But Gov. John Hickenlooper knows avoidance is no longer an option; water is running out. As Colorado’s population rises, the gap between supply and demand is expected to grow to millions of gallons of water per day by 2050.


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