Colorado

March 2, 2015--A Colorado River diminished by climate change impacts all of the Southwest, urban and rural alike (Arizona Central)

The most dire prediction of a 2012 federal supply-and-demand study of the Colorado River may have been this one: By 2060, the demand shortfall for Colorado River water could reach 1 trillion gallons — enough water to supply 6 million Southwestern households for a year. So, which 6 million households do we let go dry? Think this one through.


March 2, 2015--State Supreme Court to weigh water diversion (Aspen Journal)

A water court case in Pueblo over the size of water rights from the upper Fryingpan River delivered through the Busk-Ivanhoe tunnel to the East Slope has now blossomed into a Colorado Supreme Court case full of powerful interests opposing each other across the Continental Divide.


March 1, 2015--McPhee Reservoir at risk of mussel invasion (Associated Press)

The non-native quagga and zebra mussels are wreaking havoc on reservoirs in California, Arizona, and Nevada, clogging reservoirs and substantially increasing maintenance costs. Larvae can survive in water on boats that then infect other lakes. Annual tests show McPhee has tested negative so far for the mussels. According to the Cortez Journal, concerns rose after the U.S.


February 28, 2015--Human waste taints Animas (Durango Herald)

Elevated levels of bacteria from human waste have been found in the Animas River at the Colorado and New Mexico border for the first time. Although E. coli pollution has been a problem in the Animas and San Juan rivers in New Mexico for years, this study also revealed a different kind of bacteria found in human feces. “It’s not a result we had hoped to see. ...


February 26, 2015--Supreme Court sides with Kansas in water dispute (ABC News)

The Supreme Court on Tuesday ordered Nebraska to pay Kansas $5.5 million in a long-running legal dispute over use of water from the Republican River. The justices also gave Nebraska some of what it asked for and ordered changes to the formula for measuring water consumption. Nebraska argued that the formula was unfair.


February 25, 2015--Final results of river pollutant study to be presented (Four Corners News)

The final results from a study of contaminants in the San Juan and Animas rivers will be presented at San Juan College on Thursday. A preliminary analysis of study samples found high levels of bacteria associated with human waste in both rivers.


February 25, 2015--New hope for beetle-killed landscapes (High Country News)

From the air, they look like brittle, dead landscapes: millions of acres of scratchy brown pipe cleaners and toothpick logs. Since the 1990s, naturally-occurring bark beetles have multiplied under the effects of drought, climate change and fire-repressed forests, leading to outbreaks that have ravaged forests and left land managers scrambling to deal with a glut of dead trees.


February 23, 2015--Snow causing headaches for some, free day for others (Durango Herald)

The Colorado Department of Transportation will be doing avalanche control on Coal Bank, Molas and Red Mountain passes throughout the day after a storm dumped as much as 24 inches of snow in the region. The work will require delays, which could be lengthy, said Nancy Shanks, CDOT spokeswoman in Durango.


February 21, 2015--Ciruli: It's Colorado's move on water planning (Denver Post)

Colorado's statewide water planning is overdue. California and Texas, the nation's two largest states and users of Colorado headwaters, have moved well ahead of the state in planning and investment. Both downstream states are facing major shortages.


February 19, 2015--In S.W. Colo., snowpack slips (Durango Herald)

Snowpack in Southwest Colorado is perilously low, averaging only 56 percent in an index of the San Miguel, Dolores, Animas and San Juan River basins on Wednesday. The basin index measures snowpack at U.S. Department of Agriculture sites around the region. The snowpack at the summit of Wolf Creek Pass was at only 46 percent of the median figure for the date.


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