Dolores River

September 16, 2015--Expert supports local fix for river (Cortez Journal)

In a 14-page legal review, a prominent Colorado water attorney concluded that a proposed national conservation area on the Lower Dolores River is a good way to protect local water rights against perceived federal threats.


Dolores Water Conservancy District: Water Law and Legislative Expert David Robbins to Review Dolores NCA Proposal, by Mike Preston

A recently released draft bill would ask Congress to designate portions of the Lower Dolores River as a National Conservation Area (NCA) and Wilderness Area. The much-anticipated proposed legislation was created over a five-year period by a legislative subcommittee put together by the Lower Dolores Plan Working Group.


June 20, 2015--Dolores corridor (Cortez Journal)

A diverse advisory committee of stakeholders in the Dolores River landscape has, since 2010, been crafting proposed legislation to ensconce the lower Dolores from below McPhee Dam to Bedrock as a national conservation area – a management tool that allows for significant local input on how the resources are used.


May 8, 2015--Dolores River conservation group has successful 2014 (Telluride Daily Planet)

In a presentation to the San Miguel County Board of Commissioners at their meeting Wednesday, Nature Conservancy Southwest Colorado Project Director Peter Mueller updated the board on the work of the Dolores River Restoration Partnership, a private-public partnership that works to preserve the wildlife and ecology of the river that starts in the San Juan Mountains and runs to its confluence wit


May 7, 2015--Water attorney tapped for river study (Cortez Journal)

The phrase “implied water rights” for special designations on federal lands sent chills down the spines of local irrigators at a meeting discussing the legal ramifications on their potential below McPhee dam.


April 8, 2015--Conservation, wilderness areas proposed for Dolores River (Dolores Star)

A recently released draft bill would ask Congress to designate portions of the Lower Dolores River as a National Conservation Area and Wilderness Area. The much-anticipated proposed legislation was created over a five-year period by a legislative subcommittee put together by the Lower Dolores Plan Working Group. It was released to the public last week for community discussion and input.


February 13, 2015--Proposal for Lower Dolores criticized (Cortez Journal)

The Montezuma County commission and San Juan Basin Farm Bureau have publicly come out against a fledgling proposal to create a National Conservation Area on the Lower Dolores River. Citing concerns that the designation could result in additional water being released downstream from McPhee Reservoir, the commissioners voted 3-0 to oppose any such plan.


Dolores River Restoration Partnership

The Dolores River Restoration Partnership (DRRP) has been awarded $50,000 to continue its work eradicating tamarisk along the river. The group's Tamarisk Coalition, along with The Nature Conservancy, and BLM, have worked with the Southwest Conservation Corps, and Canyon Country Youth Corps to hire and train more than 200 youth to implement and monitor much of the restoration work. As a result of their efforts, the DRRP has been selected as the winner of the 2014 Colorado Collaboration Award. The $50,000 prize recognizes excellence and innovation in nonprofit partnerships.

September 25, 2014--Water groups fund Dolores fish habitat (Cortez Journal)

Trout Unlimited and The Nature Conservancy are working to improve fish habitat and riparian health on the upper and lower Dolores River. Matt Clark, director for the Dolores River Chapter of Trout Unlimited, is organizing a project to install a fish passage and improved diversion dam at the Redburn Ranch north of Dolores.


September 25, 2014--Dolores tamarisk battle wins additional funding (Cortez Journal)

The Dolores River Restoration Partnership has been awarded $50,000 to continue its work eradicating the tamarisk scourge. The group's Tamarisk Coalition, along with The Nature Conservancy, and BLM, have worked with the Southwest Conservation Corps, and Canyon Country Youth Corps to hire and train more than 200 youth to implement and monitor much of the restoration work.


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