Drought

Colorado Weather Program Seeks Volunteers to Monitor Drought, Climate

Weather watchers are needed to help Colorado State monitor the ongoing drought and longer-term climate conditions. The Community Collaborative Rain, Hail and Snow Network, known as CoCoRaHS, is hoping to have at least one person per square mile recording observations along the Front Range, and as many as possible elsewhere in the state.


May 25, 2015--The Latest: Lake Mead hits a record low of 1,078 feet (High Country News)

Former Las Vegas water boss Patricia Mulroy made numerous deals to keep water flowing from Lake Mead to her city and installed two water intakes deep in the reservoir.


May 23, 2015--The winners and the losers of the California water crisis (Science Daily)

A recent article published in Local Environment highlights the widening gap of inequality between the wealthy and the poor of California, specifically in relation to the State's current drought. The authors, Stephanie Pincetl and Terri Hogue, discuss what has caused these inequalities to expand -- the outdated and unsupervised water regulations still currently used,


May 22, 2015--‘Miracle May’ for Colorado 
water levels (Grand Junction Sentinel)

May showers are bringing a respite for Colorado River water managers worried about keeping enough water in Lake Powell to generate electricity. “This May has really been a miracle in Colorado,” said Eric Kuhn, general manager of the Colorado River Water Conservation District, Thursday at the Mesa County State of the Rivers discussion at the Avalon Theatre in Grand Junction.


May 21, 2015--California farmers offer concession in drought (New York Times)

Faced with the increasing likelihood that the state will significantly cut their water allotment as a way to deal with the punishing drought, farmers in California’s Sacramento and San Joaquin river delta are offering to give up a quarter of the water they have considered guaranteed for more than a century.


May 18, 2015--Feds project Lake Mead below drought trigger point in 2017 (ABC News)

Federal water managers released a report Monday projecting that Lake Mead's water levels will fall below a point in January 2017 that would force supply cuts to Arizona and Nevada. The effects could be serious. Arizona's allocation of Colorado River water could be cut 11.4 percent, or by an amount normally used by more than 600,000 homes.


May 18, 2015--Colorado River report poses tough questions about future (Tucson.com)

It’s not clear how much more water people in Tucson and other cities can conserve to bail out the drought-stricken Colorado River. At some point, we’ll hit a wall at which more conservation won’t be possible. It will be difficult, if not impossible, for the region to limit the growth that threatens to outrun the water savings achieved by conservation.


May 17, 2015--The greatest water crisis in the history of the United States (Right Side News)

What are we going to do once all the water is gone?  Thanks to the worst drought in more than 1,000 years, the western third of the country is facing the greatest water crisis that the United States has ever seen. Lake Mead is now the lowest that it has ever been since the Hoover Dam was finished in the 1930s, mandatory water restrictions have already been implemented in the state of


May 17, 2015--Food and beverage companies wake up to water risks (Water Currents)

Last week, Starbucks announced that it would stop sourcing and producing its bottled water brand, Ethos Water, in California and shift production from the Golden State to Pennsylvania.


May 16, 2015--Drought’s extremes tallied at record-low Lake Mead (New York Times)

Gail Kaiser has spent much of her life here on Lake Mead, with its crystal blue water pouring into canyons and splintering off like blood vessels into coves and bays, forming the vast reservoir that stretches into two states. She was just a child when, in 1957, her father took over the marina that has stayed in her family’s hands ever since.


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