Colorado Weather Program Seeks Volunteers to Monitor Drought, Climate

Weather watchers are needed to help Colorado State monitor the ongoing drought and longer-term climate conditions. The Community Collaborative Rain, Hail and Snow Network, known as CoCoRaHS, is hoping to have at least one person per square mile recording observations along the Front Range, and as many as possible elsewhere in the state.

September 24, 2015--L.A. region pays for water from drought-stricken Lake Mead (All Gov)

Nearly five drought-stricken months after John Glionna at the Los Angeles Times wrote about how “anemic Lake Mead has hit a historic low,” Las Vegas water authorities agreed to sell a rather hefty supply from what's left in the reservoir to the Los Angeles area. The Metropolitan Water District (MWD) will pay around $45 million a year to receive 150,000 ac

September 23, 2015--Here comes the sea: The struggle to keep the ocean out of California’s coastal aquifers (Circle of Blue)

Driving on the world-famous Route 1, just south of town, a traveler looking west across fields of strawberries can see the great silvery expanse of the Pacific Ocean. The land is heavy with a harvest that will soon be trucked to grocery stores and fruit stands throughout the United States. The Pacific, in the late afternoon sun, dazzles like camera flashes. But the ocean also is stealthy.

September 18, 2015--U.S. has reached 52 percent drought (Water Online)

It’s official: Most of the U.S. is facing drought conditions. “The U.S.

September 13, 2015--No snow: Californian water source at 500-year low (Associated Press)

Snow cover in the Sierra Nevada mountain range, a water lifeline for California's cities and agriculture, has hit its lowest level in 500 years, a study said Monday. Measured on April 1, the natural, frozen reservoir was barely five percent of the 1950-2000 average, threatening tens of millions of Californians and the state's $50-billion (44-billion-euro) agriculture sector with ch

September 1, 2015--A national water grid: It's time! (Huffington Post)

California is in the fourth year of a very serious drought. Water restrictions are being imposed. Agriculture is being significantly affected, which will result in rising prices across the United States for vegetables, fruits, nuts, and so forth.

September 1, 2015--Spring rains boosted Lake Mead, heading off water emergency--for now (Arizona PBS)

Unusually high rainfall in the Colorado River basin this spring helped boost Lake Mead water levels, averting a possible water emergency that would have triggered cuts in water allocations next year. Officials had warned as recently as June that there was a 33 percent chance of a “Tier 1″ water shortage in 2016, which occurs when the water level in Lake Mead drops below an elev

August 25, 2015--Drought done, but N.M. utilities push for conservation (Durango Herald)

Water managers across New Mexico aren’t giving up on their push for residents to conserve water even though severe drought has disappeared. For the first time in more than four years, federal maps show the worst levels of drought are gone from the state, and only abnormally dry to moderate conditions exist in the western half of the state. A healthy monsoon season is to thank, a

August 4, 2015--Wildfires decimate U.S. Forest Service budget (USA Today)

Costs to battle massive, explosive wildfires have decimated the budget of the U.S. Forest Service charged with fighting the blazes, according to a new report released Wednesday. For the first time in its 110-year history, the U.S. Forest Service says it spends more than 50% of its annual budget on firefighting at the expense of other programs to prevent the infernos.

August 2, 2015--Hydro-powered irrigation: Colorado makes water work (Earth Techling)

Much of the west coast’s water comes from the Colorado river, which, as its name suggests, originates high in the Rocky Mountains of Colorado. The current drought is most severe at the end of the line in Nevada and California, but Colorado is also drying out. Restrictions on residential water use are helping, but can only do so much.

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