Drought

March 4, 2015--California drought visualization website (GISuser.com)

This visualization tool is designed to provide the public with atlas-like, statewide coverage of the drought and a timeline of its impacts on water resources. In partnership with the Bureau of Reclamation, options are being explored to expand the visualization to describe conditions across the lower Colorado River region.


March 2, 2015--A Colorado River diminished by climate change impacts all of the Southwest, urban and rural alike (Arizona Central)

The most dire prediction of a 2012 federal supply-and-demand study of the Colorado River may have been this one: By 2060, the demand shortfall for Colorado River water could reach 1 trillion gallons — enough water to supply 6 million Southwestern households for a year. So, which 6 million households do we let go dry? Think this one through.


March 1, 2015--Talented people are competing for $100,000 to help solve an intractable problem (Arizona Central)

The drought is deepening across the Western United States and our lifeline has grown more tenuous. The Colorado River that feeds Arizona and her neighboring states may not be a reliable supplier of water if today's dry conditions persist.


February 28, 2015--Calif. farms to go without federal water again in 2015 (Capital Press)

Many farms in California’s Central Valley will have to do without federal water again this year unless big spring storms replenish the state’s woeful mountain snowpack. The U.S. Bureau of Reclamation’s initial allocation, announced Feb.


February 27, 2015--Top official delivers bleak forecast for Lake Mead (Las Vegas Review Journal)

Nevada faces “significant possibilities” of water shortages if drought on the Colorado River persists into the next two years, according to an ominous forecast delivered Wednesday by a top government official.


February 26, 2015--Central Texas drought is worst on record (Circle of Blue)

On February 18, the Lower Colorado River Authority (LCRA) in Texas, a water supplier to power plants and farms, and to Austin, the fast-growing capital, announced that the deep drought that has gripped the state’s Colorado River watershed since 2008 is the worst on record.


February 26, 2015--California has entered fourth year of drought, water experts say (San Gabriel Valley Tribune)

State water officials are preparing for the fourth straight year of drought and are readying more restrictive water conservation measures under an extension of the governor’s water emergency plan.


February 25, 2015--New hope for beetle-killed landscapes (High Country News)

From the air, they look like brittle, dead landscapes: millions of acres of scratchy brown pipe cleaners and toothpick logs. Since the 1990s, naturally-occurring bark beetles have multiplied under the effects of drought, climate change and fire-repressed forests, leading to outbreaks that have ravaged forests and left land managers scrambling to deal with a glut of dead trees.


February 24, 2015--Will Utah be ready for a drier, hotter climate? (Salt Lake Tribune)

The specter of drought hanging over the Southwest is already pretty dire, with forests drying out into beetle-killed tinderboxes and reservoir levels plunging. But the current dry spell may barely register in comparison with what has happened in the distant past and could happen in the near future, according to research released this month. And we may have ourselves to blame.


February 21, 2015--Snowpack is no help to area drought (Arizona Journal)

While monsoon storms and rain throughout the year are important sources of moisture, snowpack accounts for approximately 70 percent of Arizona’s water supply, and once again snowpack levels are well below normal, including those in Navajo County. A report unveiled in early February by the U.S.


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