Flooding

November 13, 2013--Americans back greenhouse gas cuts from power plants - and what's up with Utah? (USA Today)

The vast majority of Americans in each of 40-plus states surveyed say global warming is real, serious and man-made, and the concerns tend to be slightly higher in coastal or drought-stricken areas, says an analysis out today. 


November 12, 2013--Report on climate change depicts a planet in peril (Los Angeles Times)

Climate change will disrupt not only the natural world but also society, posing risks to the world's economy and the food and water supply and contributing to violent conflict, an international panel of scientists says. The warnings came in a report drafted by the United Nations-backed


November 9, 2013--Will Obama's climate preparation order force flood planners into the future? (High Country News)

It's been over a month since rain-swollen creeks tore through roads and flooded homes in Colorado's Front Range. While the camera crews have long since gone home, the disaster isn't over for families who suffered property damage. Of the 20,000 single-family homes in the Boulder area, only 3,504 had flood insurance in one of the highest ratios in Colorado.


November 7, 2013--Warming report sees dangerous future (Durango Herald)

Starvation, poverty, flooding, heat waves, droughts, war and disease already lead to human tragedies.


November 6, 2013--Watering holes (Huff Post)

Climate change provokes not just water rising up over our heads but emotional flooding as well.


November 2, 2013--Farmers struggling after flooding (9 News)

Harvests are late and water systems are damaged as farmers around Colorado struggle after September's flooding. "Some of the frustration now is, in the wake of this disaster, there's not as much attention being given to the crisis that the agriculture sector is facing," said Adrian Card with the Colorado State University Extension.


October 31, 2013--Tipton urges more storage (Pueblo Chieftain)

More storage is needed to prevent flooding and provide certainty for Western agriculture during droughts, U.S. Rep. Scott Tipton said Tuesday. “Without the ability to store the water that falls on Colorado’s slopes, the West as we know it would not exist,” Tipton said during a House water and power subcommittee hearing.