Flooding

July 25, 2013--Flooding concerns rise after West Fork fires (Monte Vista Journal)

With things beginning to return to normal after the lifting of evacuations and road closures because of the West Fork Fire Complex, danger remains in the Valley. The public is encouraged not to become complacent.


July 17, 2013--Teams assess post-fire flooding threats (Alamosa Courier)

While the West Fork Complex Fire cools under rainy summer skies; flash floods and debris flows become a growing threat to both property owners and natural resources.


July 1, 2013--Global warming may drive more active La Niña pattern (Summit Voice)

Climate scientists have long suspected that global warming has an influence on the Pacific Ocean El Niño- La Niña cycle (El Niño-Southern Oscillation), but instrumental records tracking the shift between above- and below average sea surface temperatures don’t go back far enough to provide context for any recent changes in the pattern.


June 27, 2013--Fires threaten water quality (Pagosa Sun)

Not only are the fires threatening the landscape, they are also threatening water quality in Pagosa Country. With monsoon season approaching, residents can expect to find silt, ash and debris in their water sources. This turbidity can impact the capacity of reservoirs as well as the quality of water. Until the monsoon arrives, conditions are perilously dry.


May 29, 2013--Forest Service ‘red zone’ report highlights sucesses of fuel treatments, challenges of more exurban growth (Summit Voice)

 As the U.S. population grows, so does exurban development in the fire-prone red zone, formally and awkwardly called the wildland-urban interface. Just in the last decade of the 20th century, the WUI grew by 18 percent, putting more lives, homes and infrastructure in harm’s way. According to a new U.S.


May 26, 2013--Climate researchers discover new rhythm for El Niño (Science Daily)

El Niño wreaks havoc across the globe, shifting weather patterns that spawn droughts in some regions and floods in others. The impacts of this tropical Pacific climate phenomenon are well known and documented. A mystery, however, has remained despite decades of research: Why does El Niño always peak around Christmas and end quickly by February to April?


May 3, 2013--NASA study projects warming-driven changes in global rainfall (Wall Street Journal)

A NASA-led modeling study provides new evidence that global warming may increase the risk for extreme rainfall and drought. The study shows for the first time how rising carbon dioxide concentrations could affect the entire range of rainfall types on Earth.


April 26, 2013--Drought divide is taking shape across the USA (USA Today)

The nation is seeing a sharp divide between dry and wet as summer approaches: While the eastern USA is almost entirely drought-free, drought continues to persist and intensify in much of the country to the west of the Mississippi River. Many areas of the West are ending the wet season with "bleak spring runoff prospects and increasing drought concerns," according to this week's U.S.


March 16, 2013--Some river gauges could be victims of budget cuts (Denver Post)

Some of the stream and river gauges used around the country to help forecasters predict flood and drought could be discontinued as a result of automatic federal budget cuts that went into effect this month, officials said Friday. Nationally, 375 of the 8,000 USGS-operated gauges are at risk.

February 8, 2013--Predictions of the human cost of climate change (Science Daily)

A new book, "Overheated: The Human Cost of Climate Change," predicts a grim future for billions of people in this century. It is a factual account of a staggering human toll, based on hard data. Author Andrew Guzman, an authority on international law and economics, is a professor and associate dean at UC Berkeley School of Law.


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