Flooding

November 12, 2012--Water supply in a warming world (New York Times)

More than anything else, climate change is a water problem. Scientists expect more coastal flooding and possibly more inland flooding. They expect higher temperatures and greater evaporation to deplete water resources, creating risks for the food supply. They believe sea-level rise will eventually render some regions uninhabitable.


October 29, 2012--River floods predicted using new technology (Environmental News Network)

Scientists are now using high-tech solutions to provide real-time forecast of the dangers of river floods caused by climate change and human activities to help avoid disasters. Not all countries are equal in the face of floods.


October 3, 2012--Deforestation in snowy regions causes more floods (Science Daily)

New research suggests that cutting down swaths of forest in snowy regions at least doubles -- and potentially quadruples -- the number of large floods that occur along the rivers and streams passing through those forests.


February 23, 2012--Colorado: Water managers eye spring runoff (Summit Voice)

Even though it feels like winter is just getting started in the high country, Colorado water managers are starting to think about spring runoff, flooding and water storage. Denver Water will issue its first spring reservoir outlook early next month after the March 1 snowpack figures have been compiled, and the National Weather Service this week issued its first outlook for flood potential.


November 13, 2011--Rising air pollution worsens drought, flooding, new study finds (Science Daily)

Increases in air pollution and other particulate matter in the atmosphere can strongly affect cloud development in ways that reduce precipitation in dry regions or seasons, while increasing rain, snowfall and the intensity of severe storms in wet regions or seasons, says a new study by a University of Maryland-led team of researchers.


November 4, 2011--The Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta future (Environmental News Network)

USGS scientists and academic colleagues have investigated how California's interconnected San Francisco Bay and Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta (the Bay-Delta system) is expected to change from 2010 to 2099 in response to both fast and moderate climate warming scenarios.


Durango’s Worst Flood: October 5, 1911

Rainfall in semi-arid Southwest Colorado is usually a blessing, but in 1911, it was another story after 36 hours of rain dropped 3.42 inches of rain in Durango and 4 inches in Silverton.


October 9, 2011--Durango’s worst flood ever (Durango Herald)

More than 100 bridges washed away. Several deaths. Railroad tracks, more than 300 miles worth, destroyed in every direction. All telegraph and telephone communications lost. Six feet of water rushing down 15th Street. Virtually all the crops in the Animas Valley destroyed. An estimated $1.5 million in damage across the region.


June 16, 2011--Spring extreme weather events in 2011 in U.S.: historic and record setting (Washington Post)

Spring 2011 may well go down in the weather history books as the most extreme on record. From the massive April tornado swarm, to record Mississippi river levels, to extreme drought and wildfires in the Southwest, weather extremes were both violent and relentless, taking a terrible toll on human life and the economy.


June 12, 2011--Colorado: Feds give $3 million for emergency flood aid (Summit Voice)

Ranchers dealing with the effects of the heavy spring runoff this year may get a little extra help from the federal government, as Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack announced that the U.S. Department of Agriculture is providing $3 million in Emergency Watershed Protection (EWP) Program funds to five western states where record mountain snowpack presents a potential flood risk.

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