Groundwater

March 29, 2015--Tipton will re-introduce his water rights measure (Grand Junction Sentinel)

U.S. Rep. Scott Tipton, R-Colo., will tweak a previous measure of his to have the federal government recognize states’ water laws, Tipton said Saturday at the Club 20 spring meeting. A measure he plans to carry this Congress will take aim at a U.S. Forest Service directive he criticized as an overreach on control of groundwater.


March 20, 2015--No, California won't run out of water in a year (Los Angeles Times)

California's water situation is troubling, but experts say decades worth of groundwater remain. Lawmakers are proposing emergency legislation, state officials are clamping down on watering lawns and, as California enters a fourth year of drought, some are worried that the state could run out of water. State water managers and other experts said Thursda

March 18, 2015--As California sets new water restrictions, Arizona resources dwindle (Arizona Public Media)

On Tuesday, California officials passed tough new restrictions on water usage in urban areas. The State Water Resources Control Board of California passed new restrictions on urban water agencies that, among other things, limits landscape watering to two days a week in cities that don't already have restrictions in place. With longterm drought forecast across the West, s


March 18, 2015--Overpumping of Central Valley groundwater creating a crisis, experts say (Los Angeles Times)

A simple instrument with a weight and a pulley confirmed what hydrologist Michelle Sneed had suspected after seeing more and more dirt vanish from the base of her equipment each time she returned to her research site last summer. The tawny San Joaquin Valley earth was sinking a half-inch each month. The reason was no mystery.


February 18, 2015--Pinching our aquifer piggy banks in California, Colorado and beyond (Mountain Town News)

To grasp the immensity of the groundwater pumping in California during the last century, think back to the last time you flew into Las Vegas. Before descending into McCarran International Airport, you may have swept across Lake Mead. When full, the reservoir is 112 miles long and up to 532 feet deep.


February 6, 2015--Water expert: NM is draining water reserves (Albuquerque Journal)

If water were dollars and New Mexico a bank, our checking account would be busted and we’d be dipping dangerously into savings. That’s how Sam Fernald, director of the New Mexico Water Resources Research Institute, thinks about the state’s dire water conditions.


January 29, 2015--Hickenlooper: Water usage not storage will solve Colorado's shortfall (Denver Post)

The population growth in Colorado and other western states cannot continue unless water supply challenges are met, Gov. John Hickenlooper and state planners said Thursday in opening the Colorado Water Congress annual conference.


January 28, 2015--Natural breakdown of petroleum may lace arsenic into groundwater (Environmental News Network)

In a long-term field study, U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and Virginia Tech scientists have found that changes in geochemistry from the natural breakdown of petroleum hydrocarbons underground can promote the chemical release (mobilization) of naturally occurring arsenic into groundwater.


January 24, 2015--Report: Farming and urban growth are polluting America’s aquifers (Circle of Blue)

Farming and urban growth, two forces that are reshaping the land surface, are also changing the chemistry and physical properties of the nation’s aquifers, leading to greater concentrations of natural and manmade pollutants that could persist for decades in essential underground water sources, according to a comprehensive U.S.


January 24, 2015--Irrigation water use drops by 30 percent in Nebraska (Journal Star)

Water used to irrigate and grow corn and other agricultural crops dropped by 30 percent across a wide swath of Nebraska last year. And a recent report by the U.S. Geological Survey indicates that, on average, the condition of the Ogallala Aquifer is stable and significantly healthier in Nebraska than in all other states over significant portions of the massive freshwater aquifer.


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