Growth

July 7, 2015--Whose job is it to worry if a city's water supply is sustainable? (Sustainable Cities Collective)

The headline asks one of the big questions prompted by a recent Planetizen interview with Denver Planning Director Brad Buchanan. It’s broached in the comments thread in a lively exchange between Jim Safranek and Jake Wegmann. Mr. Safranek says it’s a planner’s obligation to consider the long-term security of a city’s water supply. Mr.


Water Conservation Nullified by Growth

According to an early April Water Online article, while California residents are trying to conserve water, it may do little good in the face of population growth. California water agencies are on track to satisfy a state mandate to reduce water consumption 20 percent by 2020, but according to their own projections, that savings won’t be enough to keep up with population growth just a decade later.


Endless Growth

The punishing California drought is forcing a reconsideration of whether the aspiration of untrammeled growth that has for so long been this state’s driving engine has run against the limits of nature. “Mother Nature didn’t intend for 40 million people to live here,” said Kevin Starr, a historian at the University of Southern California who has written extensively about this state.


June 29, 2015--In a water-scarce West of the future, who will be hit hardest? (Conversation)

Despite recent flooding in Colorado and Texas, the multi-year California drought has brought water scarcity to the forefront of conversation throughout the West. There has been lots of debate in the media and in scientific circles about whether this drought is a preview of a “new normal” for western water.


June 25, 2015--How a historical blunder helped create the water crisis in the West (NPR)

In 1922, seven Western states — Colorado, Utah, New Mexico, Arizona, Nevada, Wyoming and California — drew up an agreement on how to divide the waters of the Colorado River. But there was one big problem with the plan: They overestimated how much water the river could provide. As a result, each state was promised more water than actually exists.


June 24, 2015--ProPublica investigates Colorado River water woes (Public News Service)

The investigative journalism group ProPublica has been taking an in-depth look at the water crisis in the West, in a series that is focused on the Colorado River. As part of the series Killing the Colorado, reporter Abrahm Lustgarten spent months interviewing people on all sides of the water-use debate, from farmers in Arizona to city leaders in Las Vegas. What he said he's l


June 24, 2015--Water Lines: Colorado water leaders set ambitious conservation goals (grand Junction Press)

Discussions and disputes over how to meet the water needs of Colorado’s growing population typically revolve around the proper balance between taking additional water from agriculture, taking additional water from the West Slope to the Front Range, and conservation. Conservation would seem to be the low-hanging fruit, but the nuts and bolts of how to conserve enough to avoid more tra


June 22, 2015--Society will collapse by 2040 due to catastrophic food shortages, says Foreign Office-funded study (Independent)

A scientific model supported by the Foreign Office has suggested that society will collapse in less than three decades due to catastrophic food shortages if policies do not change. The model, developed by a team at Anglia Ruskin University’s Global Sustainability Institute, does not account for society reacting to escalating crises by changing global behaviour and poli


June 17, 2015--The Colorado River is not a water buffet. So why the 'first come, first serve' policy? (Guardian)

As water shortages grip California and the seven state Colorado River basin, many users feel no pain, while some face a complete curtailment. That’s because the water management system is not designed to be either efficient or equitable but consistent and predictable.


June 16, 2015--Where population poses the greatest challenges (Huffington Post)

In many countries, water tables are falling and lakes are shrinking. The UN warns that the world could be facing a "40 percent global water deficit" by 2030. Again, high fertility countries will be among the worst affected. The population of Yemen, one of the most water-stressed nations in the world, is projected to increase by 49 percent by 2050.


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