Growth

May 18, 2015--Colorado's growth brings a call to link water and land planning (KUNC)

Colorado has experienced massive population growth in the last few years, a that trend is projected to continue. Finding enough water to meet the demands of the booming Front Range has city planners closely looking at how new developments can be built with conservation as a key component.


May 18, 2015--Colorado River report poses tough questions about future (Tucson.com)

It’s not clear how much more water people in Tucson and other cities can conserve to bail out the drought-stricken Colorado River. At some point, we’ll hit a wall at which more conservation won’t be possible. It will be difficult, if not impossible, for the region to limit the growth that threatens to outrun the water savings achieved by conservation.


May 1, 2015--NASA-funded study: Industrial civilization headed for 'irreversible collapse'? (Guardian)

A new study partly-sponsored by Nasa's Goddard Space Flight Center has highlighted the prospect that global industrial civilization could collapse in coming decades due to unsustainable resource exploitation and increasingly unequal wealth distribution.


April 20, 2015--'One water' can solve many supply problems (Green Biz)

Why do we make a water shortage worse by carving it into separate problems? Current events in California are drawing attention to the current and projected gap between water supply and demand projections.

April 18, 2015--Booming cities, taxed rivers, and tumbleweeds frame Colorado's water plans (Colorado Public Radio)

On a recent Friday, farmer Dale Mauch climbed down into a dry ditch of the Fort Lyon Canal, which feeds Arkansas River water to his farm. He explained that two days ago, this ditch in Prowers County was clear of weeds. Then a cold front moved in. “In 10 minutes, it can do this,” he said, standing near tumbleweeds that come up to his chest.


April 9, 2015--Water conservation nullified by population growth (Water Online)

Many California residents are trying to conserve water, but it may do little good in the face of population growth. "California water agencies are on track to satisfy a state mandate to reduce water consumption 20 percent by 2020.


No Water, No Growth by Mary Ann Dickinson, Alliance for Water Efficiency

The following is a condensed version of an article that was published in the Alliance for Water Efficiency’s Water Currents newsletter and is reprinted with permission:

We’re accustomed to waiting in lines for a football game, to buy movie tickets or perhaps to get a seat in the most coveted professor’s class. But what if we had to wait in line to move? What if we had to be granted access to a city where we found a great new job or the family dream home we always wanted? This idea isn’t so far-fetched; in some places, it’s already an unfortunate reality. In the seaside village of Cambria, California, 666 families and individuals are currently waiting for permission to move into their single family homes. Many have been on the wait list for upwards of 20 years. Why have communities resorted to such extreme measures? The answer: insufficient water supplies to hook up to new homes and facilities. Planners and decision-makers are increasingly challenged with the task of accommodating new water customers which in turn places limits on overall economic growth and deters businesses from investing or expanding operations that can create jobs and bring opportunity to cities.


Expert: Overpopulation and City Expansion Result in Colorado River Water Shortages

According to a mid-February Grand Canyon News story, experts say conservation efforts like not watering lawns, taking shorter showers, turning off faucets, and not washing your vehicle are not going to help in a long-term solution for water shortages along the Colorado River Basin. According to John Weisheit, Conservation Director for Living Rivers, the only thing that will stop water from disappearing is to put the brakes on population growth and city expansion. Living Rivers, located in Moab, Utah, is an educational organization dedicated to conservation, preservation and restoration of the Colorado Plateau and is considered by many to be the voice of most non-governmental organizations located in the Colorado Basin areas. For the last 15 years Living Rivers has said the Colorado River Basin area is going to run out of water. According to Weisheit the only solution is to inform the public that the Colorado River water supply is gone in the West and there is no room for further business or residential opportunities. While population control may seem like a drastic measure, even if a solution to slow down the shortages were presented right now, it would take years to get underway and even then may not make a difference. "It's not something that can be fixed in one year--it'll take 30 years," Weisheit said.


April 5, 2015--California drought tests history of endless growth (New York Times)

 For more than a century, California has been the state where people flocked for a better life — 164,000 square miles of mountains, farmland and coastline, shimmering with ambition and dreams, money and beauty. It was the cutting-edge symbol of possibility: Hollywood, Silion Valley, aerospace, agriculture and vineyards.


April 2, 2015--Drought could push California to rethink water strategy (USA Today)

California's historic drought has thrown the state into crisis mode, but some experts hope it will force long-term improvements in how the state manages water. Gov. Jerry Brown announced California's first-ever mandatory water restrictions Wednesday, calling for a 25% reduction in water use and encouraging water districts to charge consumers more for excessive consumption.


Syndicate content