October 9, 2015--Business leaders pitch water sharing between urban, rural communities (Durango Herald)

Business leaders Thursday said they hope to replace the practice of “buy-and-dry” with “buy-and-grow,” a plan that would allow farmers to share their water rights with municipalities. The idea was proposed at a meeting in Denver with state and local water officials, hosted by the Denver Metro Chamber of Commerce. Kelly Brough, chief executive of the chamber, sa

Colorado Water and Growth Dialogue

Whose job is it to worry if a city, town, or rural area's water supply is sustainable? Some believe it’s a planner’s obligation to consider the long-term security of water supply, while others contend that securing a sustainable water supply too overarching for a single planner and department. Complicating the issue is the fact that not everyone who deals in water supply and land use is on the same page. Land use planning is typically a local governmental concern, while water planning and allocation occur on multiple local, state, and federal levels. The traditional disconnect between planning and land use decisions and current and future water supply realities can preclude a sustainable balance between water supply and growth. To-these-ends, the Colorado Water Institute and the Keystone Policy Center have joined forces for a two-year project to tackle what they call the “dilemma” of water use in Colorado. The project, referred to as the Colorado Water and Growth Dialogue, is an attempt to explore and demonstrate how the integration of water and land use planning should be utilized to reduce water demand from the development and re-development associated with the projected population increases. This approach to planning aims to direct and incentivize smart, water-wise growth in lieu of allowing pure market conditions to guide how Colorado grows. 

September 22, 2015--UN report shows staggering cost of land degradation (Summit Voice)

Unsustainable land-use practices are a $6.3 trillion drain on the global economy, according to a new report from the United Nations University, which assesses the value of ecosystem services provided by land resources such as food, poverty reduction, clean water, climate and disease regulation and nutrients cycling. That figure is equal to about 15 percent of global GDP, the researcher sai

September 17, 2015--Population growth may force new water partnerships across industry (Water Online)

As population growth strains the water supply in parts of Colorado, officials are considering creative new partnerships that could help ensure the availability of water. “Growth in Fort Collins and Northern Colorado has always been contingent on the availability of water.

August 24, 2015--Water fight stirs up old rivalries in Colorado (Wall Street Journal)

As many as 60,000 tourists raft the Colorado River above this scenic canyon town each summer, and local boosters want to keep them coming—by diverting some of the river’s flow to feed a new network of white-water recreation parks.

July 20, 2015--2nd version of water plan to set key principles (Grand Junction Sentinel)

The second version of the Colorado Water Plan offers some assurance to the Western Slope about the process for deciding how the state will deal with water issues, but it still leaves the Western Slope open to pressure from the east and west, water officials said. The second version of the plan unveiled this month also earned plaudits from environmental organizations for its emphasis on con

July 8, 2015--Second draft of Colorado Water Plan released (Aspen Journal)

The second draft of the Colorado Water Plan was released on July 7th and it calls for new sources of public and private funds to build new water supply projects that are still yet to be determined. “Financing long-term sustainable water supplies and infrastructure projects requires a collaborative effort involving water users and providers, as well as federal, state, and local e

July 7, 2015--Whose job is it to worry if a city's water supply is sustainable? (Sustainable Cities Collective)

The headline asks one of the big questions prompted by a recent Planetizen interview with Denver Planning Director Brad Buchanan. It’s broached in the comments thread in a lively exchange between Jim Safranek and Jake Wegmann. Mr. Safranek says it’s a planner’s obligation to consider the long-term security of a city’s water supply. Mr.

Water Conservation Nullified by Growth

According to an early April Water Online article, while California residents are trying to conserve water, it may do little good in the face of population growth. California water agencies are on track to satisfy a state mandate to reduce water consumption 20 percent by 2020, but according to their own projections, that savings won’t be enough to keep up with population growth just a decade later.

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