Growth

March 11, 2015--Homebuilders’ biggest issues: Water, immigrant labor (Grand Junction Sentinel)

Colorado needs to move quickly on high elevation water storage projects, homebuilders told U.S. Rep. Scott Tipton, R-Colo., on Tuesday. New houses need new water taps, Bob Jenkins of the Colorado chapter of the National Homebuilders Association said in a meeting Tuesday with Tipton.


March 10, 2015--Calculating the cost of river floods in an age of climate change (CityLab)

Last September, India and Pakistan experienced devastating floods made deadlier because of shoddy urban planning and sluggish disaster management. About 600 people died, roughly 300 on either side of the border, as the river Jhelum flooded.


March 5, 2015--Flood and drought risk to cities on rise even with no climate change (Science Daily)

A heads-up to New York, Baltimore, Houston and Miami: a new study suggests that these metropolitan areas and others will increase their exposure to floods even in the absence of climate change, according to researchers from Texas A&M University.


March 2, 2015--A Colorado River diminished by climate change impacts all of the Southwest, urban and rural alike (Arizona Central)

The most dire prediction of a 2012 federal supply-and-demand study of the Colorado River may have been this one: By 2060, the demand shortfall for Colorado River water could reach 1 trillion gallons — enough water to supply 6 million Southwestern households for a year. So, which 6 million households do we let go dry? Think this one through.


February 26, 2015--Central Texas drought is worst on record (Circle of Blue)

On February 18, the Lower Colorado River Authority (LCRA) in Texas, a water supplier to power plants and farms, and to Austin, the fast-growing capital, announced that the deep drought that has gripped the state’s Colorado River watershed since 2008 is the worst on record.


February 22, 2015--Wheat experts warn on global warming impacts (Summit Voice)

Scientists in the biggest wheat-producing state in the U.S. issued a stark climate change warning last week, saying that 25 percent of the world’s wheat production will be lost to extreme weather if no adaptive measures are taken.


February 18, 2015--Pinching our aquifer piggy banks in California, Colorado and beyond (Mountain Town News)

To grasp the immensity of the groundwater pumping in California during the last century, think back to the last time you flew into Las Vegas. Before descending into McCarran International Airport, you may have swept across Lake Mead. When full, the reservoir is 112 miles long and up to 532 feet deep.


February 17, 2015--Expert: Overpopulation and city expansion likely cause of future Colorado River Basin water shortages (Grand Canyon News)

Experts say conservation efforts like not watering lawns, taking shorter showers, turning off faucets and not washing your vehicle are not going to help in a long-term solution for water shortages along the Colorado River Basin.


February 15, 2015--State’s population growth expected to outstrip water conservation in coming years (Sacramento Bee)

California water agencies are on track to satisfy a state mandate to reduce water consumption 20 percent by 2020. But according to their own projections, that savings won’t be enough to keep up with population growth just a decade later. A 2009 state law requires urban water agencies to reduce per-capita water consumption 20 percent by 2020, compared with use at the start of the century.


February 13, 2015--Return of the Dust Bowl? Climate change study highlights how West must adapt (Christian Science Monitor)

A prolonged period of Dust Bowl-like conditions in the second half of this century could severely test strides made toward conserving scarce water supplies in the Western United States and central Plains, according to a new study.


Syndicate content