In The News

April 1, 2015--Oceans might take 1,000 years to recover from climate change, study suggests (Los Angeles Times)

Naturally occurring climate change lowered oxygen levels in the deep ocean, decimating a broad spectrum of seafloor life that took some 1,000 years to recover, according to a study that offers a potential window into the effects of modern warming.


March 31, 2015--The water revolution is here (Environmental Leader)

At current usage and population rates, international demand for water in 2030 will outstrip supply by 40 percent. As fresh water supplies dwindle, nations across the globe will face unprecedented, unsettling, and formerly unthinkable choices regarding water, compelled to make difficult decisions about how to allocate the precious resource.


March 31, 2015--Colorado’s snow is dust-free for the first time in a decade (High Country News)

Last March, while kayaking the sandstone labyrinth of Utah’s San Juan River, I was punched in the face with a wall of wind. It howled up-canyon with a biting ferocity, carrying particles of red sand that scoured our faces and forced us into a cave for hours to seek shelter.


March 30, 2015--Federal funding in short supply for rural water projects (Washington Times)

A pipeline project intended to bring billions of gallons of water a year to a drought-stricken section of eastern New Mexico represents a lifeline to parched communities that are quickly running out of water. The lifeline, however, might not reach the region for more than a decade, even though officials say some areas don’t have that long before wells dry up.


March 30, 2015--Glimpses of the future: Drought damage leads to widespread forest death (Science Daily)

The 2000-2003 drought in the American southwest triggered a widespread die-off of forests around the region. A Carnegie-led team of scientists developed a new modeling tool to explain how and where trembling aspen forests died as a result of this drought. It is based on damage to the individual trees' ability to transport water under water-stressed conditions.