In The News

August 20, 2015--Attorneys general hear account of Gold King Mine spill (Durango Herald)

Situated nearly 11,400 feet above sea level deep in the San Juan National Forest, the long-abandoned Gold King Mine is now surrounded by a flurry of activity from various state and federal agencies working to contain and treat wastewater leaking as a result of a catastrophic spill earlier this month just outside the small mountain town of Silverton.

August 18, 2015--After the blowout: Silverton faces watershed moment in wake of Gold King Spill (Silverton Standard)

Tucked in amongst towering mountains and surrounded by wilderness with no easy way in or out, Silverton is one of the smallest, highest, most rugged and isolated communities in Colorado. But the three million gallon spill that the Environmental Protection Agency accidentally unleashed from the nearby Gold King Mine into Cement Creek and the Animas River on Aug.

August 17, 2015--Interior Department to investigate Gold King Mine accident (Durango Herald)

The Environmental Protection Agency announced Tuesday that the Department of Interior will do an independent review of the Gold King Mine blowout. According to a news release, the Interior Department will work to assess what caused the release of three million gallons of metals-contaminated wastewater Aug. 5 from the mine near Silverton.

August 16, 2015--In wake of Animas River catastrophe, Bennet will back Good Samaritan law (Durango Herald)

The accident that turned the Animas River orange may be revitalizing efforts to allow more reclamation projects that wouldn’t be managed by the Environmental Protection Agency. The Gold King Mine, now infamous for polluting the Animas River, is one of many mines near Silverton that have been oozing heavy metals for years.

August 16, 2015--Animas River spill's political fallout defies expectations (Denver Post)

In a Donald Trump-esque political moment, Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper defied all convention, all health and environmental fears about the Animas River, and took a drink of its water five days after 3 million gallons of pollution turned it orange.