In The News

June 29, 2015--Lake Mead decline below 1,075 feet is symbolic (Tucson.com)

If New Year’s Day had happened last week, the Central Arizona Project would have suffered the first water shortage in its 35-year history. That’s because Lake Mead — where CAP water is stored at the Nevada border — dropped below 1,075 feet elevation late Tuesday, and stayed that way off and on the rest of the week. That’s the level at which the federal go


June 29, 2015--EPA to plug Silverton mine soon (Durango Herald)

Mine remediation and greater monitoring above Silverton this summer will help ease the level of poisonous metals in the Animas River, at least at first. At the Red and Bonita Mine, where polluted water is pouring out at 500 gallons per minute, Environmental Protection Agency workers would like to put a stop to the flow by September, said Steven Way, on-scene coordinator for the agency.&nbs


June 28, 2015--Can cloud-seeding ride to the rescue? (Mountain Town News)

After a so-so winter, the snow piled up through May in the mountains of Colorado, taking the edge off drought. This takes the edge off of the big Colorado River reservoirs, Lake Mead and Lake Powell.


June 27, 2015--World’s aquifers losing replenishment race, researchers say (New York Times)

From the Arabian Peninsula to northern India to California’s Central Valley, nearly a third of the world’s 37 largest aquifers are being drained faster than they are being replenished, according to a recent study led by scientists at the University of California, Irvine.


June 26, 2015--Colorado River shortage requires basin states to work together (Utah Public Radio)

The water level at Lake Mead reached a record low on Wednesday, forcing federal water managers to guide the level back above a crucial drought trigger point. Special interest groups are asking political leaders to work together to find ways to better manage water challenges in the West.