In The News

February 25, 2015--New hope for beetle-killed landscapes (High Country News)

From the air, they look like brittle, dead landscapes: millions of acres of scratchy brown pipe cleaners and toothpick logs. Since the 1990s, naturally-occurring bark beetles have multiplied under the effects of drought, climate change and fire-repressed forests, leading to outbreaks that have ravaged forests and left land managers scrambling to deal with a glut of dead trees.


February 25, 2015--São Paulo--anatomy of a failing megacity: Residents struggle as water taps run dry (Guardian)

In São Paulo, drinking water is used flush toilets, bathe and, until very recently, to wash cars and even hose down city pavements, as porters use jets of crystalline water to shift those last specks of grime. In Brazil, a land of immense natural riches and home to around 12% of the world’s fresh water, the very idea of a water shortage is hard for people to conceive of.


February 25, 2015--Cheap water in Arizona could hide big costs for business (Phoenix Business Journal)

Phoenix and Arizona may pride itself for the low cost of doing business, but a new report says the cost of at least one substance vital to businesses — water — is artificially low. In a Feb.


February 24, 2015--Will Utah be ready for a drier, hotter climate? (Salt Lake Tribune)

The specter of drought hanging over the Southwest is already pretty dire, with forests drying out into beetle-killed tinderboxes and reservoir levels plunging. But the current dry spell may barely register in comparison with what has happened in the distant past and could happen in the near future, according to research released this month. And we may have ourselves to blame.


February 23, 2015--Snow causing headaches for some, free day for others (Durango Herald)

The Colorado Department of Transportation will be doing avalanche control on Coal Bank, Molas and Red Mountain passes throughout the day after a storm dumped as much as 24 inches of snow in the region. The work will require delays, which could be lengthy, said Nancy Shanks, CDOT spokeswoman in Durango.