In The News

August 13, 2015--Congressmen appeal to Obama after Gold King disaster (Durango Herald)

Colorado and New Mexico lawmakers sent President Barack Obama a letter Wednesday urging him to direct federal resources toward addressing the Gold King Mine spill that unleashed 3 million gallons of contaminated mine sludge into the Animas River last week. The letter was sent by Colorado’s U.S. Sens. Michael Bennet and Cory Gardner; U.S. Rep. Scott Tipton; New Mexico’s U.S. Sens.


August 12, 2015--The new UN sustainable development goals (SDGs) and fresh water (Huff Post)

For 15 years, the world community has worked to achieve a comprehensive set of goals and targets called the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) - launched in 2000 to tackle poverty, economic and environment inequity, and strategies for effective development. The MDGs concluded this year, and a new set of goals to replace them have been in design and negotiation for some time.


August 12, 2015--Experts see long-term calamity from Colorado mine spill (Science Monitor)

The toxic waste gushing from a Colorado mine and threatening downstream water supplies in at least three states will continue to be dangerous whenever contaminated sediments get stirred up from the river bottom, authorities said Wednesday, suggesting that there's no easy fix to what could be a long-term calamity.


August 12, 2015--Animas River lawsuit against EPA 'on the table,' Colorado AG says (Denver Post)

Colorado Attorney General Cynthia Coffman said Wednesday that a lawsuit against the Environmental Protection Agency is "on the table" after a massive wastewater spill caused by the agency fouled the Animas River last week. "I would hope that it would not be necessary," Coffman, a Republican, said.


August 11, 2015--Hickenlooper on mine spill: ‘We take this as a catalyst’ (CBS News)

Gov. John Hickenlooper on Tuesday personally inspected the Animas River after the massive spill of wastewater. The plume of wastewater is gone and the river is clearing up, but it’s still off limits until at least next week. Yellow sludge can still be seen on the shorelines of the river. Hickenlooper says he’s concerned about health and businesses.