In The News

February 16, 2015--Nasa climate study warns of unprecedented North American drought (Guardian)

California is in the midst of its worst drought in over 1,200 years, exacerbated by record hot temperatures. A new study led by Benjamin Cook at Nasa GISS examines how drought intensity in North America will change in a hotter world, and finds that things will only get worse. Global warming intensifies drought in several ways. In increases evaporation from soil and reservoirs.


February 15, 2015--Gulf of Mexico dead zone cleanup target pushed back (Summit Voice)

In a classic example of government double-speak, the EPA announced this week that Mississippi River Basin states want to speed the reduction of nutrients that cause a huge Gulf of Mexico dead zone, but that they’re pushing back their target date for a cleanup by 20 years.


February 15, 2015--State’s population growth expected to outstrip water conservation in coming years (Sacramento Bee)

California water agencies are on track to satisfy a state mandate to reduce water consumption 20 percent by 2020. But according to their own projections, that savings won’t be enough to keep up with population growth just a decade later. A 2009 state law requires urban water agencies to reduce per-capita water consumption 20 percent by 2020, compared with use at the start of the century.


February 15, 2015--Is Silverton ready for a cleanup? (Durango Herald)

All around Silverton, where a series of mines – once lucrative, now abandoned – pock the earth like gaping, oozing wounds, the waters course with poison. Silverton resident Melody Skinner said her now dead dog Hannah wouldn’t drink water from Cement Creek – which U.S.


February 14, 2015--Source Water Collaborative issues 'call to action' to better protect drinking water resources (Water World)

In its recent call to action, the Source Water Collaborative (SWC), an organization comprised of federal, state and local partners aiming to protect drinking water sources, stated that ongoing changes to water quality and quantity are challenging the nation to redouble its efforts to protect its water resources.