In The News

June 16, 2015--Colorado cuts into use-or-lose system that caused water waste (Denver Post)

Colorado water rights owners are forging a way out of the state's ingrained "Use It Or Lose It" rule that penalizes those who divert less than their full allotment from rivers — opening a path to cut water use as shortages grip the West. For 139 years, state enforcers have said farmers, cities and ranchers who don't use all the water they are entitled to could have


June 15, 2015--Study shows vast potential for cutting water use on farms (Deseret News)

Already 1 million acre-feet of water once used on farms, ranches and orchards throughout the seven states in the Colorado River basin is being "saved," mainly through water system improvements and reductions in consumption. A probe of water use by the agricultural sector is included in the "Moving Forward" phase of the Colorado River Basin Supply and Demand St


June 14, 2015--California moves to restrict water pumping by pre-1914 rights holders (Los Angeles Times)

In a rare action, California officials move to restrict water diversions by senior rights holders. Some pre-1914 California water rights holders ordered to reduce diversions. For the first time in nearly 40 years, state regulators are telling more than 100 growers and irrigation districts with some of the oldest water rights in California that they have to stop drawing suppli

June 13, 2015--White House provides $100 million in aid to drought-stricken West (Washington Post)

As a third of the West copes with severe drought, the Obama administration announced Friday it would provide more than $100 million to help affected communities and combat wildfires in the region. The funding comes on top of the more than $190 million federal agencies have already spent to help communities in the West, and is separate from the at least $1.2 billion the Agriculture Dep


June 13, 2015--Vallecito release has homeowners on edge (Durango Herald)

Hydrologists opened the spigots Friday on Vallecito Reservoir, releasing more water than typically considered safe to keep up with recent rainstorms. Emergency workers monitored high-water conditions on several streams and rivers throughout La Plata County.