In The News

July 13, 2015--When a tree falls in the forest, what’s the impact on water resources? (phys.org)

Forest management practices such as cutting or thinning trees reduce the risk of wildfires, and enhance the overall health of the woodlands. However, they also can speed up the pace of snow melt, which in turn may increase erosion and destabilize streams.


July 11, 2015--Interactive map: Indian water rights in the Colorado River Basin (Circle of Blue)

With the oldest claims to water, Native American tribes in the Colorado River Basin command a considerable role in directing the region’s future. Combined, the tribes hold rights to a substantial portion of the Colorado River’s flow: roughly 20 percent, or 2.9 million acre-feet, which is more water than Arizona’s allocation from the river.


July 10, 2015--Justice Gregory Hobbs reflects on water, justice (Colorado Statesman)

“Get a tie. A real tie!” For Coloradans who follow the stylings of Gov. John Hickenlooper, that might sound familiar. But that’s advice Justice Gregory L. Hobbs got the day he was appointed to the Colorado Supreme Court. After almost two decades on the bench, the Supreme Court will lose its most respected expert on water law. Hobbs steps down on Aug.


July 10, 2015--It's about to get easier for California farmers to conserve water—and sell it (CityLab)

There’s no “solving” California’s drought, as so many headlines suggest. Drought is a regular feature of the Western climate cycle.