In The News

August 3, 2015--Glaciers melting faster than ever (Science Daily)

The World Glacier Monitoring Service, domiciled at the University of Zurich, has compiled worldwide data on glacier changes for more than 120 years. Together with its National Correspondents in more than 30 countries, the international service just published a new comprehensive analysis of global glacier changes in the Journal of Glaciology.


August 3, 2015--Hermosa Creek trout restoration project continues (Pagosa Daily Post)

The multi-year project to restore native Colorado River cutthroat trout to more than 20 miles of the Hermosa Creek watershed is continuing this summer. The project is a cooperative effort of Colorado Parks and Wildlife, the U.S. Forest Service and Trout Unlimited. The Hermosa Creek project is one of the largest native trout restoration project ever done in the state.


August 2, 2015--Hydro-powered irrigation: Colorado makes water work (Earth Techling)

Much of the west coast’s water comes from the Colorado river, which, as its name suggests, originates high in the Rocky Mountains of Colorado. The current drought is most severe at the end of the line in Nevada and California, but Colorado is also drying out. Restrictions on residential water use are helping, but can only do so much.


August 1, 2015--Colorado farmers grow more food on less water amid rising competition (Denver Post)

While farmers around him give up control over water used for a century to irrigate crops, Marc Arnusch is crouching in a thick cornfield inspecting blue digits on his new sensor. The third-generation farmer installed it to measure exactly the level of moisture in soil right at the roots of his corn. He's also considering underground tubes that emit water only upon contact by roots.


July 31, 2015--New documentary takes you on a Colorado water journey through history -- and into your tap (7News)

The state of Colorado is predicted to double its population by 2050, the demand for water is mounting, and supplies are limited. A new documentary film called, "The Great Divide," from Colorado filmmaker Jim Havey, addresses the important and complex issues surrounding Colorado water.