RO Operation and Maintenance Seminars

02/05/2007 8:00 am
02/06/2007 5:00 pm

A series of six Watertech sponsored RO Operation, Maintenance, Monitoring, and Troubleshooting seminars beginning February 5th and running through September 18th at various locations across the country. For more information or to register visit watertechonline.com.


January 16, 2007--Farmers Seek Well-Water OK (Denver Post)

Some northern Colorado farmers who had their groundwater pumps shut off last summer will try to convince a state panel this week that they're not drawing down the South Platte River.


January 13, 2007--Tamarisk and Water (Cortez Journal)

Tamarisk not only steals water from the system, it has many other detrimental effects. Tamarisk really is the shark of the plant world. It roots deeply, seeds abundantly, provides scarce habitat for wildlife, and encroaches on river and stream channels, causing flow problems. In the 1920's tamarisk covered about 10,000 acreas in the Southwest.


January 16, 2007--Utility Aims to Refill Aquifer (Albuquerque Tribune)

The Albuquerque-Bernalillo County Water Utility Authority is trying to recharge the aquifer beneath Albuquerque. A small research project will examine how the area can take advantage of extra water that can be saved for the future. The $985,000 project, will divert water from the Rio Grande into an arroyo, where it will seep into the ground.


January 7, 2007--State Ponders Water Temperature Standards (Pueblo Chieftain)

Water temperature standards in Colorado will be reviewed at a state hearing, capping a three-year effort to revise criteria most say are outdated and unscientific. Two versions of regulations are being proposed, one by the Water Quality Control Division and one by the so-called "Temperature Group," a coalition of municipal and industrial interests.


January 14, 2007--New Mexico Runoff Looks Better for This Year (Farmington Daily Times)

Rain last summer and snow this winter have improved the odds for a better water year along the Rio Grande in southern New Mexico. Elephant Butte Irrigation District water engineer Phil King said farmers will likely get 9 acre-inches of water to start the season--about two-thirds of the 14 acre-inches they received during the entire season last year.


January 15, 2007--Recent Blizzards Fill Denver Water's Reservoirs (Durango Herald)

For only the second time, Denver Water's reservoirs gained storage during the month of December, thanks to back-to-back snowstorms. The last time that happened was when the 1982 Christmas blizzard hit the Front Range. After years of drought, the two river basins on the Eastern Plains are both well ahead of the rest of the state, which averages 98 percent.


January 9, 2007--Possible Reservoir Feasibility Study Angers Some at Meeting (Grand Junction Daily Sentinel)

A possible $500,000 feasibility study for a Blue Mesa Reservoir pumpback proposal sparked the ire of the Gunnison Basin Roundtable members. Generally unhappy about the the possibility of water being pumped to the Front Range from Mesa Reservoir, roundtable members disagreed about the possibility without knowing whether there's enough water available to send over the Continential Divide.


January 5, 2007--Ritter Picks Natural Resources Chief (Den-AP)

Governor-elect Bill Ritter has appointed Harris Sherman, former head of the Department of Natural Resources, to return as executive director. Sherman served as head of the Department of Natural Resources from 1975 to 1980 under former Governor Dick Lamm.

January 10, 2007--State Settles with Southern N.M. Farmers Over Water Meters (Farmington Daily Times)

The state engineer and disgruntled farmers have reached an agreement in a dispute over a state requirement for meters on groundwater wells. Eventually, meters will be used to enforce water rights. Under the settlement, the state will require meters on wells, but farmers who are working to comply won't have their wells shut off in the meantime. 


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