Irrigation

August 1, 2015--Colorado farmers grow more food on less water amid rising competition (Denver Post)

While farmers around him give up control over water used for a century to irrigate crops, Marc Arnusch is crouching in a thick cornfield inspecting blue digits on his new sensor. The third-generation farmer installed it to measure exactly the level of moisture in soil right at the roots of his corn. He's also considering underground tubes that emit water only upon contact by roots.


July 10, 2015--It's about to get easier for California farmers to conserve water—and sell it (CityLab)

There’s no “solving” California’s drought, as so many headlines suggest. Drought is a regular feature of the Western climate cycle.


June 30, 2015--Here's how U.S. groundwater travels the globe via food (Smithsonian)

Freshwater in the United States is really on the move. Much of the water pulled from underground reservoirs called aquifers gets incorporated into crops and other foodstuffs, which are then are shuttled around the country or transferred as far away as Israel and Japan, according to a new study.


June 25, 2015--How a historical blunder helped create the water crisis in the West (NPR)

In 1922, seven Western states — Colorado, Utah, New Mexico, Arizona, Nevada, Wyoming and California — drew up an agreement on how to divide the waters of the Colorado River. But there was one big problem with the plan: They overestimated how much water the river could provide. As a result, each state was promised more water than actually exists.


June 15, 2015--Study shows vast potential for cutting water use on farms (Deseret News)

Already 1 million acre-feet of water once used on farms, ranches and orchards throughout the seven states in the Colorado River basin is being "saved," mainly through water system improvements and reductions in consumption. A probe of water use by the agricultural sector is included in the "Moving Forward" phase of the Colorado River Basin Supply and Demand St


June 10, 2015--May rains boost water outlook (Mancos Times)

The rains of May have continued into June and drastically improved irrigation supply in McPhee Reservoir. Low winter snowpack had led forecasters to believe that the reservoir would not fill enough for a full irrigation supply. In early May, farmers were told they would receive just 10 inches per acre, less than half their full allocation of 22 inches. But record rain and snow in


June 9, 2015--Conservation district promotes new identity (Mancos Times)

The Dolores Conservation District is changing its name and embarking on a marketing campaign to raise awareness of its agricultural services. The first step is the name change to High Desert Conservation District. "The old name has been confusing for people," said district manager Judy Garrigues.


June 8, 2015--Can leasing irrigation water keep Colorado farms alive? (High Country News)

Statewide, cities have acquired at least 191,000 acre-feet of agricultural water, eliminating farming and ranching on millions of acres. Water managers estimate Colorado could lose up to 700,000 more acres by 2050.


May 27, 2015--Holy crop, how federal dollars are financing the water crisis in the West (ProPublica)

The water shortages that have brought California, Arizona and other Western states to the edge of an environmental cliff have been attributed to a historic climate event — a dry spell that experts worry could be the worst in 1,000 years.


May 24, 2015--Farm water to city taps: It won't be cheap (Tucson.com)

To save the Colorado River and keep Western farming going at the same time, urban dwellers will have to pay. That’s the conclusion of an expert who helped lead a new federal study on what to do about the Colorado.


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