Irrigation

May 27, 2009--Rain showers could save the city $240,000 (Colorado Springs Gazette)

The folks who take care of Colorado Springs' parks were glad it rained every day of Memorial Day weekend. Watering the city's 869 acres of grass costs $40,000 a night.

May 26, 2009--Ark Valley water studies undergo review (Pueblo Chieftain)

There is no shortage of ongoing studies looking at water issues in the Arkansas Valley, and they are the focus of the May/June issue of Colorado Water, a publication by the Water Center at Colorado State University-Fort Collins.


May 24, 2009--N.M. tribe works to restore spring (Durango Herald)

After years of drought and livestock grazing, a spring sacred to an Native American tribe in north-central New Mexico has dried up, and now the concern is that erosion, climate change and the region's growing demand for water will keep the spring from recovering.


May 24, 2009--Judge: Consider water needs of farmers and fish (Denver Post)

A federal judge ruled that the federal water authorities had to consider the needs of farmers and communities as well as fish when allocating delta water. The decision Friday delighted growers in the western San Joaquin Valley.


May 23, 2009--Southwest's earliest known irrigation system unearthed in Arizona (L.A. Times)

Archaeologists preparing for the expansion of a Tucson wastewater treatment facility have discovered the remains of the earliest known irrigation system in the Southwest, a farming community that dates to at least 1200 BC. That predates the well-known and much more sophisticated Hohokam tribe's canal system, which crisscrossed what is now Phoenix, by 1,200 years.


May 23, 2009--Southwest's earliest known irrigation system unearthed in Arizona (L.A. Times)

Archaeologists preparing for the expansion of a Tucson wastewater treatment facility have discovered the remains of the earliest known irrigation system in the Southwest, a farming community that dates to at least 1200 BC. That predates the well-known and much more sophisticated Hohokam tribe's canal system, which crisscrossed what is now Phoenix, by 1,200 years.


May 22, 2009--Sweetners linger in groundwater (Environmental News Network)

After tickling the tongue, artificial sweeteners pass through our bodies and end up in wastewater virtually unchanged. Some sweeteners are particularly widespread in the environment, according to a new study, making them ideal markers for following pollution from treatment plants and other sources into the environment.