Lake Mead

March 30, 2015--What severe drought in the Colorado River Basin looks like (Washington Post)

Lake Powell, one of the nation’s largest reservoirs, is now below 45 percent of its capacity. Straddling the border between Utah and Arizona, the man-made reservoir is part of the Colorado Water Basin that supplies water to 40 million people.


March 23, 2015--Innovative thinking spurs water deal (Arizona Central)

As part of a deal approved by the Arizona Corporation Commission, the private company, Liberty Utilities, will recharge about 78 billion gallons of treated effluent into the West Valley's aquifer.


March 13, 2015--Forecasters predict another down year for Lake Mead (Las Vegas Review-Journal)

A lackluster year so far on the Colorado River has local water managers and National Park Service officials bracing for further declines at Lake Mead. According to the latest federal forecast, released Wednesday, the reservoir is expected to fall to a new record low next month and slip downward from there, shedding a total of about 20 feet through June 2016. The bleak new estimat


February 27, 2015--Top official delivers bleak forecast for Lake Mead (Las Vegas Review Journal)

Nevada faces “significant possibilities” of water shortages if drought on the Colorado River persists into the next two years, according to an ominous forecast delivered Wednesday by a top government official.


February 18, 2015--Pinching our aquifer piggy banks in California, Colorado and beyond (Mountain Town News)

To grasp the immensity of the groundwater pumping in California during the last century, think back to the last time you flew into Las Vegas. Before descending into McCarran International Airport, you may have swept across Lake Mead. When full, the reservoir is 112 miles long and up to 532 feet deep.


February 12, 2015--Lake Powell and the Colorado River Basin’s disappearing 2015 water (Ink Stain)

The Colorado Basin’s two primary reservoirs lost, on paper, a million acre feet of water because of January’s dry snowpack, according to the latest numbers from the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation. That’s the difference between what we expected to end the current water year with based on the January forecast, versus what the forecast looks like today, a month later.


February 7, 2015--Climate change will increase evaporation of Colorado River (Las Vegas Review-Journal)

The Colorado River faces a dual threat from climate change as rising temperatures increase the demand for irrigation water and accelerate evaporation at the river’s two largest reservoirs. So says a new report from the U.S.


January 29, 2015--CAP official: 61 percent chance of Colorado River shortage by 2017 (Cronkite News)

There is a 61 percent chance of the U.S. Interior Department declaring a shortage on the lower Colorado River by 2017, a Central Arizona Project official told state lawmakers Thursday.


January 8, 2015--21 photos from the frontlines of climate change (Inside Climate News)

A coalition of some of the world's top photographers launched a project this month to document how climate change is altering communities, wildlife and landscapes across the globe. Known as EveryDayClimateChange, the venture is housed on Instagram.


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