Press Clippings

March 6, 2015--Colorado bill would ban microbeads in personal care products (7 News)

A bill to ban tiny plastic particles that are often included in soaps and cosmetic products passed another hurdle in the state legislature this week. The bill to ban the microbeads by 2020 won preliminary approval in the House and faces a final vote before heading to the Senate. In May 2014, the CALL7 Investigators were first to expose concerns over microbeads in Colorado wa


March 5, 2015--Flood and drought risk to cities on rise even with no climate change (Science Daily)

A heads-up to New York, Baltimore, Houston and Miami: a new study suggests that these metropolitan areas and others will increase their exposure to floods even in the absence of climate change, according to researchers from Texas A&M University.


March 5, 2015--Rising temperatures are amplifying drought effects, study finds (Los Angeles Times)

Climate change is increasing the risk of severe drought in California by causing warm periods and dry periods to overlap more often, according to a new study. Rising temperatures resulting from increased greenhouse gas emissions mean warm and dry periods are coinciding more frequently, the study authors say. And that is amplifying the effects of low precipitation.


March 5, 2015--Nutrient pollution damages streams in ways previously unknown, ecologists find (Science Daily)

An important food resource has been disappearing from streams without anyone noticing until now. In a new study published March 6 in the journal Science, a team of researchers led by University of Georgia ecologists reports that nutrient pollution causes a significant loss of forest-derived carbon from stream ecosystems, reducing the ability of streams to support aquatic life


March 4, 2015--Outlook improves for water throughout Colorado (Denver Post)

Unsurprisingly, to anyone who has spent the past few weeks in or around Denver, the South Platte River Basin leads Colorado's snowpack statistics at 113 percent of average as of Tuesday.


March 4, 2015--California drought visualization website (GISuser.com)

This visualization tool is designed to provide the public with atlas-like, statewide coverage of the drought and a timeline of its impacts on water resources. In partnership with the Bureau of Reclamation, options are being explored to expand the visualization to describe conditions across the lower Colorado River region.


March 3, 2015--Water 4.0: The past, present, and future of the world's most vital resource (Water Log)

David Sedlak, a civil engineering professor at the University of California and the director of ReNUWit, an engineering research center for Reinventing the Nation's Urban Water Infrastructure, wrote this book to provide a vision of water management in the future by tracking its history.


March 2, 2015--Water loss: Seven things you need to know about an invisible global problem (Guardian)

Water loss is often referred to as non-revenue water (NRW) – water that is produced in a network but never reaches the consumer. This might be due to aging networks which haven’t been properly managed, metering inaccuracies, theft or unmetered authorised consumption, like water used from fire hydrants.


March 2, 2015--A Colorado River diminished by climate change impacts all of the Southwest, urban and rural alike (Arizona Central)

The most dire prediction of a 2012 federal supply-and-demand study of the Colorado River may have been this one: By 2060, the demand shortfall for Colorado River water could reach 1 trillion gallons — enough water to supply 6 million Southwestern households for a year. So, which 6 million households do we let go dry? Think this one through.


March 2, 2015--State Supreme Court to weigh water diversion (Aspen Journal)

A water court case in Pueblo over the size of water rights from the upper Fryingpan River delivered through the Busk-Ivanhoe tunnel to the East Slope has now blossomed into a Colorado Supreme Court case full of powerful interests opposing each other across the Continental Divide.


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