Press Clippings

October 8, 2016--Bridging science and policy for better water strategies--Part 3 (Arizona State University)

It's 118 at Lake Mead on a July afternoon, but the thermometer on the boat’s depth finder says the lake is a cool 67 degrees. Naturally, you jump in. It tastes earthy and mossy, if mossy can be a taste, and ultimately it’s what 30 million people survive on. This is the stuff and place thousands of professionals are focused on.


October 7, 2016--EPA probes toxic Colorado mine tunnels, investigates possible harm to human health (Denver Post)

Sloshing knee-deep through acid orange muck in a dark mining tunnel, an EPA crew wearing air monitors and headlamps peered at a massive concrete plug, one of 13 installed in these cored-out mountains above Silverton. They are wrestling with the Environmental Protection Agency’s riskiest problem as post-Gold King disaster cleanup begins: whether to try to contain toxic mine


October 5, 2016--Floating new ideas for water solutions--Part 2 (Arizona State University)

To reach the floating docks at Temple Bar Marina on Lake Mead, you have to cross a 200-yard-long gangway stretching across cracked mud flats that used to be the lake bottom. Mike Reisbig moored his boat there on an August afternoon.


October 4, 2016--Looming megadroughts in western US would make current drought look minor (Guardian)

The harsh drought currently gripping California may appear trivial in the future as new research shows that the south-west US faces the looming threat of “megadroughts” that last for decades. California is in its sixth year of drought, which was barely dented by rains brought by the El Niño climate event and sparked a range of water restrictions in th


October 3, 2016--The future of water in the Southwest--Part 1 (Arizona State University)

Atop Hoover Dam on a 115-degree July afternoon, tourists line up to suck cold water from fountains and crowd into the air-conditioned cafe and visitors’ center. Transpose both those actions to the 30 million people who depend upon that blue-green water behind the dam. That’s water for a jogger in Santa Monica. Water for an oleander hedge in Phoenix.


October 2, 2016--California's almond boom has ramped up water use, consumed wetlands and stressed pollinators (Science Daily)

A new study using aerial imagery across the state of California has found that converting land to grow almonds between 2007 and 2014 has led to a 27% annual increase in irrigation demands -- despite the state's historic drought.


October 1, 2016--Native Americans and conservationists collaborate to return vital flow to the Rio Grande (Water Currents)

The first time I saw the channel of the Rio Grande completely dry, I was stunned. Here was the second largest river in the Southwest, which flows through three U.S. states and Mexico, and instead of water between its banks there were tire tracks. And I wasn’t standing at the tail end of the river, but rather on a bridge in central New Mexico, in the Rio Grande’s middle reach.


September 30, 2016--Hundreds weigh in on Hermosa Creek management plan (Durango Herald)

Several hundred public comments were received regarding a resource management plan for the Hermosa Creek Watershed Management Plan, 


September 29, 2016--Draft bill for conservation area gets a rewrite (Cortez Journal)

Challenges have arose in the rewrite of a draft bill proposing the Dolores River National Conservation Area and Dolores River Canyon Wilderness designation below McPhee Dam. The draft legislation is being written collaboratively by conservationists, several counties, water districts, agricultural groups and recreationists. Its intent is to forge a compromise that further protec


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