Press Clippings

August 2, 2016--EPA report links Colorado to errors that led to Gold King Mine spill (Durango Herald)

The Environmental Protection Agency continues to link the state to errors that resulted in the release of 3 million gallons of toxic mining sludge into the Animas River. In a one-year retrospective released Monday by the EPA, the federal agency is careful to underscore how the state was involved in planning that led to the blowout, which turned the Animas mustard yellow and deposite


August 2, 2016--Sunnyside Gold Corp. calls for dismissal of New Mexico lawsuit (Durango Herald)

Twenty-five years ago Tuesday, Sunnyside Gold Corp. shuttered the last operating mine in Silverton, yet the company’s involvement in the region is very much alive. On Friday, Sunnyside – now owned by international mining conglomerate Kinross Gold Corp.


August 1, 2016--Minimal impacts from loss of Powell power, canyon institute says (Grand Junction Sentinel)

A group that wants to see the restoration of Glen Canyon and draining of Lake Powell says a new study shows such actions would have minimal impacts from the resulting loss of hydropower. The Glen Canyon Institute says the study it commissioned found there would be negligible impact on the western power grid and electric rates would go up by an average of 8 cents per month for


July 31, 2016--Killing the Colorado: Documentary addresses river water (Hava Sun News)

The Colorado River never captured the American imagination like its sister, the mighty Mississippi. While the Mississippi brings to mind images of steamboats, rustic charm and Mark Twain, the Colorado is all business. The Colorado River isn’t romanticized, but it is vital to the West – and according to a new Discovery Channel documentary, it is dying.


July 30, 2016--EPA culpable but not alone in Gold King Mine mess (Denver Post)

A year ago, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency wound up red-faced after the Gold King Mine blowout turned the Animas River orange. Since then, the EPA won grudging support from Silverton and San Juan County to designate the Bonita Mountain mining district as a Superfund site, but little or no progress has been made on the ground toward a permanent fix.


July 29, 2016--Where are the world’s most water-stressed cities? (Guardian)

Water stress – where the human or ecological demand for water is not met – is caused by a variety of factors.


July 29, 2016--Denver Water CEO calls for more flexibility in water management (Aspen Daily News)

Jim Lochhead, the CEO and manager of Denver Water, said Tuesday that building new dams in the Colorado River basin is not at the top of his to-do list. Nor, for that matter, is drying up farms to provide water for Colorado’s growing cities. But he says Colorado still needs to have hard conversations about how to flexibly manage its water.


July 28, 2016--Colorado River Lower Basin water users leaving nearly 500,000 acre feet in Lake Mead this year (InkStain)

Colorado River water use in Arizona, Nevada, and California this year is currently forecast at 7.006 million acre feet (source:pdf), well below the three states’ nominal legal entitlement of 7.5 mill


July 28, 2016--Forecasts complicated Dolores boating season, officials say (Cortez Journal)

A sporadic 12-day boating release from McPhee dam into the Dolores River in June was hampered by uncertain runoff forecasts after a late-season snowfall, reservoir managers said at community meeting Tuesday in Dolores. Boaters faced on-again, off-again announcements of whitewater releases from the dam, which complicated their plans for trips down the river.


July 27, 2016--The Colorado River’s unexpected carbon footprint (High Country News)

When water rushed over the dry riverbed of the Colorado River Delta for the first time in two decades, thousands of bubbles popped up in the sand. Alongside the bank, a group of scientists stood in awe, theorizing that oxygen and nitrogentrapped in the sediment were the cause.


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