Runoff

August 13, 2016--Discoloration in Animas River no cause for alarm (Durango Herald)

With snowmelt all but complete and monsoons in full swing, residents can expect periodic discoloration of the Animas River, a public health official said Thursday. The river appeared orangish in color Thursday near Baker’s Bridge, according to a bicyclist who rode by and took notice.


July 25, 2016--Snow, runoff and the Colorado River Basin (Mountain Town News)

From his office in Glenwood Springs overlooking the Colorado River, Eric Kuhn has become one of the West’s most prominent thinkers about the intersection of water, climate change, and allocations for farms, factories and cities, including ski towns. He joined the Colorado River Water Conservation District as an engineer after working in the private sector as a nuclear engin


April 10, 2016--Colorado River runoff forecast keeps dropping (Arizona Daily Star)

Drought continues to put the squeeze on the Southwest’s water supplies, with Colorado River runoff forecasts declining for the second straight month. The April-July forecast for Colorado River runoff into Lake Powell is 74 percent of average, down from 80 percent in early March.


March 23, 2016--Spring runoff red-flags Animas aquatic life (Cortez Journal)

Water samples taken from the Animas River during the season’s first spring runoff since August’s Gold King Mine spill raise a “red flag” for potential harm to aquatic life in the waterway. On Feb.


February 27, 2016--New Mexico, Navajo Nation prepare for spring run-off carrying heavy metals (NMED News)

While temperatures warm and the high altitude snowpack in Colorado’s Southern Rockies & San Juan Mountains begins to melt, Animas/San Juan watershed communities are getting ready for the re-disturbance of toxic heavy metals in their primary water source. The U.S.

January 23, 2016--Despite El Niño, BuRec predicts average year (Montrose Press)

El Niño has showered its bounty on the region, particularly the Four Corners area south of Montrose.


July 13, 2015--When a tree falls in the forest, what’s the impact on water resources? (phys.org)

Forest management practices such as cutting or thinning trees reduce the risk of wildfires, and enhance the overall health of the woodlands. However, they also can speed up the pace of snow melt, which in turn may increase erosion and destabilize streams.


June 20, 2015--"Miracle May" rescues regional water prospects (Pine River Times)

A "miracle May" has turned around grim water supply prospects for the region, at least for this year, several speakers told the Upper Colorado River Commission Thursday in Durango. The commission has one representative from each of the four Upper Colorado River Basin states (Colorado, Wyoming, Utah, and New Mexico) and one federal representative.


May 29, 2015--Rains bring incomplete drought relief to parts of Southwest (High Country News)

Much of Colorado has been getting soaked. "Last I checked we lived in a high mountain desert not a temperate rainforest," a friend of mine on the Western Slope quipped on Instagram, under a photo of two Adirondack chairs swallowed by grass higher than their arms. Here in New Mexico, people are getting grumpy.


May 22, 2015--‘Miracle May’ for Colorado 
water levels (Grand Junction Sentinel)

May showers are bringing a respite for Colorado River water managers worried about keeping enough water in Lake Powell to generate electricity. “This May has really been a miracle in Colorado,” said Eric Kuhn, general manager of the Colorado River Water Conservation District, Thursday at the Mesa County State of the Rivers discussion at the Avalon Theatre in Grand Junction.


Syndicate content