Runoff

April 3, 2012--Warm, dry March creates early snowmelt, runoff (Denver Post)

It's official. The bone-dry March shriveled the state's snowpack to its lowest level ever recorded for early April.


March 12, 2012--Climate: South Platte flows could drop by 40 percent (Summit Voice)

A new study by the Water Research Foundation projects potential climate change impacts to Front Range water supplies for the next few decades, showing that the total amount of water in several key river basins could decline significantly if temperatures continue to rise.


March 8, 2012--Water supply good even as snowpack lags (Summit Daily)

Statewide snowpack is still well behind average, and even further behind last year at the same time, but it's slowly improving, Natural Resource Conservation Service officials say.


February 28, 2012--Drought spreading throughout Colorado (Pueblo Chieftain)

Snow in February was not enough to drag the state out of a lingering drought. Most of Colorado is now classified as under drought conditions, according to a report by the state’s water availability task force, which met last week in Denver. “Early February precipitation in parts of the state has helped to increase snowpack levels somewhat.


February 23, 2012--Colorado: Water managers eye spring runoff (Summit Voice)

Even though it feels like winter is just getting started in the high country, Colorado water managers are starting to think about spring runoff, flooding and water storage. Denver Water will issue its first spring reservoir outlook early next month after the March 1 snowpack figures have been compiled, and the National Weather Service this week issued its first outlook for flood potential.


February 20, 2012--West: Regional water outlook still uncertain (Summit Voice)

Low season flows into Lake Powell have been near normal in recent weeks, with the Colorado River delivering about 356,000 acre feet (99 percent of average) during January, leaving the reservoir about 63 feet below full pool.


January 9, 2012--Study: Hail may disappear from Colorado's Front Range by 2070 (Summit Daily)

Summertime hail could all but disappear from the eastern flank of Colorado's Rocky Mountains by 2070, says a new study by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the University of Colorado Boulder's Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences and the National Center for Atmospheric Research.


January 6, 2012--It’s a winterless wonderland across U.S. (Durango Herald)

Nationwide, the lack of snow is costing tens of millions of dollars in winter recreation, restaurant, lodging and sporting goods sales, experts said. “Early in the winter, the Southwest saw some heavy snow, as did parts of the Northeast clobbered by snow around Halloween and Thanksgiving that has since melted. The Pacific Northwest has seen snow recently.


December 24, 2011--Rocky Mountain region water districts investing in cloud-seeding (Denver Post)

With the Upper Gunnison River Water Conservancy District facing steep revenue declines, district manager Frank Kugel realized the season's cloud-seeding budge


December 21, 2011--Sierra snow drought could be one for record books (USA Today)

The situation couldn't be more different from this time last year, when the Lake Tahoe Basin's snowpack was at more than twice the normal levels. On Tuesday, Tahoe's snowpack was 10 percent of average. The situation not only affects the ski slopes but also the water supply. Dry western states' primary source of water all year is snow melt.


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