Snowpack

April 21, 2014--Combined impacts of current and future dust deposition and regional warming on Colorado River Basin snow dynamics and hydrology (Hydrology and Earth Systems Science)

Abstract: The Colorado River provides water to 40 million people in seven western states and two countries and to 5.5 million irrigated acres. The river has long been overallocated. Climate models project runoff losses of 5–20% from the basin by mid-21st century due to human-induced climate change.


April 17, 2014--Winds paint dusty picture for Colorado snowpack (Boulder Weekly)

The San Juan Mountains often feel the brunt of the dust events, but a recent surge of desert air brought a thick layer as far north as Summit County at the end of March. If you’ve been skiing in the high country lately and noticed the pinkish snow, no need to check your goggles.


April 8, 2014--Snowpack dust is trending upward (Durango Herald)

The good news is that this year’s dust storms have not deposited as much grit on this area’s snowpack as last year’s. The bad news: Last year “broke the sound barrier” for dust deposits, and this year is continuing a decade-long increase. That’s according to the latest measurements by the Center for Snow and Avalanche Studies.


April 8, 2014--‘Pray for rain’ (Durango Herald)

Hamburger. Steak. Prime rib. However you like it, beef is what’s for dinner on many local tables. But the folks who put it on the plate are dealing with the consequences of two years of drought and looking at another one coming up if some good precipitation doesn’t come our way.


April 7, 2014--With our snowpack suffering, water outlook is weak (Durango Herald)

The outlook for water in Southwest Colorado this spring and summer isn’t favorable, the April snowpack report from the Natural Resources Conservation Service says. The snowpack in the combined Animas, San Juan, Dolores and San Miguel river basins was 79 percent of the 30-year median April 1; however, this week’s storms brought the basins up to 82 percent.


April 3, 2014--Big snowpack suspends Wyoming cloud seeding (Casper Star & Tribune)

Above-average snowfall in the mountains of southern Wyoming has forced an early end to part of the state's cloud-seeding research project as a precaution against exacerbating potential spring flooding. Barry Lawrence, project manager with the Wyoming Water Development Office, said the cloud seeding was stopped Wednesday morning in the Medicine Bow and Sierra Madre ranges in southern Wyoming.


April 3, 2014--Water shortages for New Mexico farmers, fish (Albuquerque Journal)

Much of the snowpack in northern New Mexico and southern Colorado is already gone, but it seems to be blowing away in the wind rather than melting into the state’s streams and rivers. That has water managers scrambling to cope with the state’s fourth consecutive very dry year.


April 1, 2014--Peak snowpack reading shows no doubt of drought (Sacramento Business Journal)

The reading from what's typically the peak snowpack of the year shows what’s no surprise even with recent rain: California is still in a fairly severe drought. Snowpack surveys are at 32 percent of normal for the date, and even the prospect of more rain toward the end of the week won’t make much difference, according to the California Department of Water Resources.


March 30, 2014--Too early to tell if above average snowpack will help Colorado River (Havasu News)

It snowed hard all winter in the Rocky Mountains, and come spring that’s always been a sign that once that huge snowpack melts, the Colorado River will tumble mightily with a greater bounty of water to keep the Southwest viable. The overall snowpack is now at 115 percent of average for this time of the year in the Rockies.


March 24, 2014--Spring snow goes downhill (UCAR)

At some point in a typical winter, almost half of the entire Northern Hemisphere’s land area is plastered with snow cover. You’d expect that snow to disappear in the spring, and, even after this unforgiving U.S. winter, most of it will. However, in recent years, spring snow has been vanishing even more quickly than computer models and climate scientists had expected.


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