Snowpack

March 17, 2015--Snowpack is declining in valleys where Colorado River originates, water watchers say (Associated Press)

Snowpack in the mountains and valleys where the Colorado River originates has been shrinking since the beginning of March, a federal water expert said Tuesday. The snow ranged between 89 and 91 percent of the long-term average, depending on which measurement is used. "We dried out relatively significantly here since the beginning of March," said Brian Domonkos, supervisor of


March 13, 2015--Record low snowpack in Western US (Crop Site)

"Nearly a third of our SNOTEL sites in the Cascades and Sierra Nevada are reporting the lowest snowpack ever measured," NRCS Hydrologist Cara McCarthy said. "For the first time, some sites were snow-free on March 1st. These areas can expect reduced summer streamflow." Recent storms helped relieve dry conditions in the Southwest.


March 4, 2015--Outlook improves for water throughout Colorado (Denver Post)

Unsurprisingly, to anyone who has spent the past few weeks in or around Denver, the South Platte River Basin leads Colorado's snowpack statistics at 113 percent of average as of Tuesday.


February 21, 2015--Snowpack is no help to area drought (Arizona Journal)

While monsoon storms and rain throughout the year are important sources of moisture, snowpack accounts for approximately 70 percent of Arizona’s water supply, and once again snowpack levels are well below normal, including those in Navajo County. A report unveiled in early February by the U.S.


February 19, 2015--In S.W. Colo., snowpack slips (Durango Herald)

Snowpack in Southwest Colorado is perilously low, averaging only 56 percent in an index of the San Miguel, Dolores, Animas and San Juan River basins on Wednesday. The basin index measures snowpack at U.S. Department of Agriculture sites around the region. The snowpack at the summit of Wolf Creek Pass was at only 46 percent of the median figure for the date.


February 5, 2015--Below-normal Colorado snowpack raises water supply concern (Colorado Public Radio)

The Natural Resources and Conservation Service released its latest snow survey Thursday"Looking back at Colorado’s mountain snowpack over the course of January, it is becoming increasingly difficult to find promising water supply outlooks for spring and summer 2015,&quo


February 1, 2015--Water managers bracing for another dry year in NM (Albuquerque Journal)

For the fourth consecutive year, New Mexico water users are watching a skimpy snowpack in the state’s northern mountains and worrying about how much water they will have this spring and summer. On the state’s largest rivers – the Pecos, the Rio Grande and the San Juan – the thin covering of mountain snow means less water in early forecasts.


January 30, 2015--Unusually high temperatures, low snow pack could spell trouble for Utah’s water needs (Fox 13)

Five degrees for six months: Those are numbers that cause serious concern for Utah water experts. Brian McInerney, Hydrologist for the National Weather Service, said from August through January, northern Utah has averaged temperatures five degrees higher than normal. “Which is incredibly significant when you talk about snow pack,” McInerney said.


January 30, 2015--Scientists see shrinking California snowpack as a harbinger (Los Angeles Times)

State workers performed a California winter ritual Thursday, poking hollow aluminum tubes into Sierra Nevada meadows to measure the snowpack. In what scientists see as a harbinger, they didn't find much. "We will conceivably see more years like this in the future," said geologist Jeffrey Mount, a senior fellow at the Public Policy Institute of California.


January 27, 2015--California water shortage: $1 billion plant will make seawater drinkable by end of 2015 (Los Angeles Times)

While much of California remains in the grip of a three-year drought, a $1 billion desalination plant that will turn seawater to drinking water is on track to open later this year to serve residents of San Diego County. Once running, the plant will be the largest of its kind in the Western Hemisphere.


Syndicate content