Water Pricing

April 13, 2015--The real reason Californians can't water their lawns (Bloomberg Business)

In response to the ongoing drought, California Governor Jerry Brown has set limits on urban water use—ordering cuts of as much as 25 percent. Cities across the state will stop watering highway median strips and rip up grass in public places. Golf courses and cemeteries will turn on the sprinklers less frequently, and water rates might rise.


April 10, 2015--Lawns targeted in water conservation discussions (Pine River Times)

Your water-sucking green lawn is a thing of the past, Gov. Jerry Brown told California residents last week. That theme carried through several presentations to a full house crowd at the 33rd annual Water Seminar on April 3 in Durango, sponsored by the Southwestern Water Conservation District.


March 24, 2015--Finding the right price for water (Atlantic)

There's a classic economic paradox about the price of water and value, and it comes from Adam Smith: Why do diamonds cost more than water? The comparison is meant to demonstrate how pricing works—that even though water is essential for human survival, our economy puts prices on things based on scarcity and value (and marginal utility).


March 8, 2015--Changing the price of water may be the way to beat drought (Deseret News)

Drought across the West and Midwest is driving renewed concerns over water scarcity and the availability to meet demand in the future.


November 20, 2014--Glennon addressed water sustainability (Duncan Banner)

Robert Glennon, water resource expert and author, presented at Cameron University’s triennial academic festival, “Sustainability: Challenges and Opportunities,” on Tuesday, addressing the water crisis that a majority of southwestern Oklahoma is experiencing. Glennon, a professor of law and public policy at the University of Ar


November 18, 2014--California's drought has reached Biblical-plague proportions. It's time for a drastic measure. (The Conversation)

Last January, California Governor Jerry Brown declared a State of Emergency following projections of severe drought. State bureaucrats and local officials jumped into action and mandated any number of water conservation tactics. While some have been relatively successful, most will do nothing.


October 26, 2014--The West needs a water market to fight drought (Wall Street Journal)

The drought in the Western U.S. from California to Texas has generated gloomy editorials and op-eds predicting dire consequences and even water wars. But the West is not running out of water, nor are prolonged fights over water inevitable.


October 20, 2014--Article discusses nation's connection to water, pricing schemes, steps toward sustainable future (Water World)

In Los Angeles and Toledo and across the U.S., historic drought, water-quality threats heightened by warming waters and poorly maintained infrastructure are converging to draw public attention to the value of fresh, clean water to a degree not seen since Congress passed the Clean Water Act in 1972.


October 15, 2014--Time for a serious policy on water pricing (Bloomberg Businessweek)

Do you know the price of your monthly cell phone bill? I bet you do. How about your water bill? What’s the cost difference between taking a shower for 5 minutes or 30 minutes? Most Americans consume plenty of clean water without worrying much, if at all, about its price. Yet which is more valuable, water or a smartphone?


October 15, 2014--The West is bone dry. Here’s how to help (Washington Post)

Drought is rampant these days in many parts of the American West, so consider this a pretty sweet gift: You’ve just been given the rights to some water. An acre-foot of it, to be exact, which is roughly enough to fill an NBA basketball court so the water laps at the bottom of the backboard. Your job is to turn around and use that resource in the most valuable way possible.


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