National Academy of Sciences

April 16, 2015--The Arctic is ‘unraveling’ due to global warming, and the consequences will be global (Washington Post)

We often hear that climate change is radically reshaping the Arctic, a place many of us have never visited. As a result, it can be pretty hard to feel directly affected by what’s happening up in a distant land of polar bears, ice floes and something odd called permafrost.


April 1, 2015--Oceans might take 1,000 years to recover from climate change, study suggests (Los Angeles Times)

Naturally occurring climate change lowered oxygen levels in the deep ocean, decimating a broad spectrum of seafloor life that took some 1,000 years to recover, according to a study that offers a potential window into the effects of modern warming.


December 10, 2014--What to do when climate change poses a risk to your water supply (Guardian)

As evidence of climate change mounts, businesses across all sectors of the economy are developing strategies for identifying and avoiding the risks it poses.


February 16, 2014--Report describes the unfathomable cost of inaction on rising seas (InsideClimate News)

The world needs to invest tens of billions of dollars a year in beefing up shoreline defenses against rising oceans or it will face mind-boggling costs in the decades to come, according to new research published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.


July 19, 2013--Study: Long-term sea level rise is inevitable (Summit Voice)

Sea level rise is here to stay, according to researchers with the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, who recently published a study combining evidence from early Earth’s climate history with comprehensive computer simulations using physical models of all four major contributors to long-term global sea-level rise.


December 31, 2012--As climate warms, bark beetles march on high-elevation forests (Science Daily)

Trees and the insects that eat them wage constant war. Insects burrow and munch; trees deploy lethal and disruptive defenses in the form of chemicals. But in a warming world, where temperatures and seasonal change are in flux, the tide of battle may be shifting in some insects' favor, according to a new study. In a report published today (Dec.


February 27, 2012--Study: Less Arctic ice means more U.S. snow (USA Today)

Most of the USA may have had a reprieve from crippling snowstorms so far this year, but remember the brutal winter of 2010-11? Continued onslaughts of frigid air and brutal blizzards made for a savage and deadly cold season across the country.


January 24, 2012--Wasting the wastewater (New York Times)

Each day, American municipalities discharge treated wastewater back into natural sources at a rate that would fill an empty Lake Champlain within six months. Growing pressure on water supplies and calls for updating the ancient subterranean piping infrastructure have brought new scrutiny to this step in the treatment process, which is labeled wasteful and unnecessary by a spectrum of voices.


August 30, 2011--Preserving 4 percent of the ocean could protect most marine mammal species (Environmental News Network)

Preserving just 4 percent of the ocean could protect crucial habitat for the vast majority of marine mammal species, from sea otters to blue whales, according to researchers at Stanford University and the National Autonomous University of Mexico. Their findings were published in the Aug. 16 edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.


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