Water Footprint

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June 18, 2014--Bad water policies (Aguanomics)

Here -- for your future reference -- are a few popular policies and their drawbacks: A national water strategy is usually inappropriate because it's at the wrong governance scale. The largest useful scale for governance is a watershed or catchment, which may cross national or political boundaries.


October 6, 2012--Parched in the West but shipping water to China, bale by bale (Wall Street Journal)

In 2012, the drought-stricken Western United States will ship more than 50 billion gallons of water to China. This water will leave the country embedded in alfalfa—most of it grown in California—and is destined to feed Chinese cows. The strange situation illustrates what is wrong about how we think, or rather don't think, about water policy in the U.S.


March 22, 2012--Scarce drinking water -- and who's guzzling around the globe (Los Angeles Times)

Thursday is World Water Day. The event, a brainchild of the United Nations, was first celebrated nearly two decades ago and is meant to focus attention on the need for fresh water around the globe. Booming populations and shifting diets mean that water is expected to be in growing demand. More meat, for instance, means more water will be needed to support animals raised for slaughter.


March 22, 2012--Happy water day, world! (Environmental News Network)

A huge amount of water goes into the food we eat — much more than most people think. Indeed, it takes a thousand times more water to feed the human population than it does to satisfy its thirst. This remarkable relationship between water and food security is exactly what the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) wants us all to contemplate today, World Water Day 2012.


June 10, 2011--Calculating water footprints: How much water in your food? (Environmental News Network)

Often, when you think about food production, it is only the carbon emissions in terms of fertilizer use, transportation etc that is accounted for. However, food production also has a steep water footprint. The water footprint is yet another environmental yardstick that measures how much water goes into the making of something.


November 29, 2010--‘Water footprinting’ to deal with demand for supplies (New York Times)

Claudia Ringler, a senior research fellow in Montreal with the International Food Policy Research Institute, based in Washington, said water footprinting was a good concept in theory, but less so in practice. “It’s almost impossible to do a comprehensive analysis,” Ms. Ringler said.


October 14, 2010--WWF's living planet eeport shows humans consuming 1.5 Earths (Environmental News Service)

"The unprecedented drive for wealth and well-being of the past 40 years is putting unsustainable pressures on our planet," writes WWF Director General James Leape in the newly released 2010 edition of WWF's Living Planet Report, a biennial survey on the state of the planet's health.


March 16, 2010--World's largest beer brewer cuts water use, braces for future risks (New York Times)

Drinking less beer and more water is usually a good diet plan -- unless you're the world's largest beer brewer. Instead, Anheuser-Busch InBev is planning to make more beer while reducing water use. Every liter it produced in 2007 required about five times as much water to produce it.


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