San Miguel River

Landmark Legal Decision Protects Instream Flows

In April the Colorado Supreme Court rendered a landmark decision upholding the instream water right for the San Miguel River in Southwest Colorado. The court deemed that a senior water rights holder, Farmers Water Development Company, is unaffected by the State of Colorado’s instream water rights on the San Miguel river and affirms that state water rights are a legitimate and essential tool to protect Colorado’s fish and wildlife.


April 3, 2015--Preliminary plan to restore San Miguel River on Valley Floor (Telluride Daily Planet)

When Telluride purchased the Valley Floor in 2008 with the intention of preserving the open space in perpetuity, organizers immediately got to work figuring out how to restore any human tinkering that had degraded the wilderness.


July 24, 2014--Trout-A-Palooza aims to help restore the San Miguel (Telluride Daily Planet)

Along the Valley Floor and the west end of Telluride, the San Miguel River will undergo a six-step management plan to help restore its natural path after alterations made generations ago to parallel the railroad tracks. The seed money for this project comes from Gunnison Gorge Anglers’ annual Trout-A-Palooza fundraiser.


June 5, 2014--Snowpack in Southwest Colorado all but gone (Durango Herald)

The snowpack in the watershed emptied by the Animas, San Juan, Dolores and San Miguel rivers is fading fast, the last report of the year by the Natural Resources Conservation Service shows. The only basin with less snowpack than the four-river watershed as of June 1 was the Upper Rio Grande.


May 10, 2014--Snowpack suffering in Southwest Colorado (Durango Herald)

The snowpack as of May 1 in the watersheds drained by the Animas, San Juan, Dolores and San Miguel rivers leaves the southwest corner of Colorado hurting. At 68 percent of its 30-year median, the amount of snow in the high country foretells a sparse runoff. Only the Rio Grande basin is worse off at 50 percent.


April 1, 2014--San Miguel tributary flowing free (Telluride Daily Planet)

In the 1930s, a 6-foot-tall, 60-feet-wide diversion dam was built in Tabeguache Creek, just upstream from its confluence with the San Miguel River, for the purposes of providing water to the Town of Uravan. That dam remained for roughly 80 years, even as the uranium mining town was abandoned, declared a Superfund Site and razed in a reclamation project.

February 23, 2014--Project to restore Hanging Flume wins state historical award (Grand Juction Sentinel)

An ambitious project to rebuild a historic flume among the cliffs above the San Miguel River south of Gateway was recently recognized for its innovative effort at reconstructing history. The 2014 Stephen H.


January 31, 2014--Board votes to raise Lower Dolores flow (Cortez Journal)

A spirited debate before the Colorado Water Conservation Board in Denver Tuesday featured local officials expressing their opinions on a plan to increase flows on the lower Dolores River.


January 13, 2014--Plans for Dolores River draw criticism (Cortez Journal)

Federal and state protection measures for the Lower Dolores River were sharply criticized by local officials Thursday during a regional water meeting in Cortez. But public land agencies and the Colorado Water Conservation board defended the decisions as part of their job to inventory special waterways and insure adequate flows on the river.


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