U.S. Bureau of Reclamation

February 27, 2015--Top official delivers bleak forecast for Lake Mead (Las Vegas Review Journal)

Nevada faces “significant possibilities” of water shortages if drought on the Colorado River persists into the next two years, according to an ominous forecast delivered Wednesday by a top government official.


February 12, 2015--Lake Powell and the Colorado River Basin’s disappearing 2015 water (Ink Stain)

The Colorado Basin’s two primary reservoirs lost, on paper, a million acre feet of water because of January’s dry snowpack, according to the latest numbers from the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation. That’s the difference between what we expected to end the current water year with based on the January forecast, versus what the forecast looks like today, a month later.


February 10, 2015--Lake Nighthorse construction likely this summer (Durango Herald)

Construction on some facilities at Lake Nighthorse could start this summer, after the Ute tribes expressed support for recreation. The letters of support will allow the Bureau of Reclamation to complete an environmental assessment, which is required for any construction to take place, said the Cathy Metz, Durango’s parks and recreation director.


February 8, 2015--Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell announces nearly $20 million for California’s Central Valley for Western Drought Response Project (Sierra Times)

Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell today announced that the Bureau of Reclamation is making $50 million in funds available immediately for drought relief projects throughout the West —including nearly $20 million for California’s Central Valley Project.


February 7, 2015--Climate change will increase evaporation of Colorado River (Las Vegas Review-Journal)

The Colorado River faces a dual threat from climate change as rising temperatures increase the demand for irrigation water and accelerate evaporation at the river’s two largest reservoirs. So says a new report from the U.S.


January 29, 2015--CAP official: 61 percent chance of Colorado River shortage by 2017 (Cronkite News)

There is a 61 percent chance of the U.S. Interior Department declaring a shortage on the lower Colorado River by 2017, a Central Arizona Project official told state lawmakers Thursday.


January 21, 2015--Officials say future looks dry for Navajo Lake (Daily Times)

Navajo Lake is currently 12 feet deeper than it was at this time last year, according to the Bureau of Reclamation. But that's where the good news ends. The snowpack and soil moisture is less than it was last year, which means less inflow into the lake, a reservoir that stretches across the state line from southern Colorado to northern New Mexico.


Colorado River Water Conservation Programs

In October the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation (USBOR) began soliciting project proposals in the Lower Basin states for water conservation from Colorado River entitlement holders in Arizona, California, and Nevada. Demand management and conservation measures are also being discussed for water users in the river's Upper Basin as a part of a Contingency Planning process to address future shortages. The Central Arizona Project, Denver Water, the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California, Southern Nevada Water Authority, and the USBOR are providing up to $11 million to pay for new Colorado River “System Conservation Agreements” as pilot projects.


December 13, 2014--Arizona farmers take hit to stave off water crisis (Arizona Central)

All it takes is 10 feet of water to go from caution to crisis on the Colorado River. That's why Arizona farmers like Dan Thelander support a new agreement that will help conserve the amount of water in Lake Mead even though it could mean short-term sacrifices for them.


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