Quagga Mussels

July 7, 2016--Colorado funding cuts make reservoirs more vulnerable to invasive species (Summit Daily)

While state funding has started drying up, a noted disturbance remains quite fluid. Two problematic varieties of freshwater shellfish — the zebra and quagga mussel — are always of concern at area water bodies where they are an aquatic nuisance species, or ANS.


March 1, 2015--McPhee Reservoir at risk of mussel invasion (Associated Press)

The non-native quagga and zebra mussels are wreaking havoc on reservoirs in California, Arizona, and Nevada, clogging reservoirs and substantially increasing maintenance costs. Larvae can survive in water on boats that then infect other lakes. Annual tests show McPhee has tested negative so far for the mussels. According to the Cortez Journal, concerns rose after the U.S.


January 14, 2015--McPhee at risk for invasive species (Dolores Star)

Colorado Parks and Wildlife, the U.S. Forest Service, the Dolores Water Conservancy District, and local municipalities all have a common enemy - the invasive zebra and quagga mussel species.


April 22, 2014--McPhee boat check could lose funding (Cortez Journal)

The invasive quagga and zebra mussels have not been detected in McPhee Reservoir, but they’re causing havoc in nearby Lake Powell. Boat inspections at McPhee have been effective in keeping the pests out of local waters so far. However, with shrinking budgets for Colorado Parks and Wildlife and the U.S. Forest Services, the critical checkpoints have an uncertain future.


Mussels Moving West of the 100th Meridian

Zebra and quagga mussels are a freshwater shellfish that have spread like an aquatic plague

March 11, 2014--Biologist discovers safe way to kill zebra mussels, Great Lakes’ silent invaders (Star & Tribune)

Since they arrived in the Great Lakes in the 1980s, two species of mussels the size of pistachios have spread to hundreds of lakes and rivers in 34 states and have done vast economic and ecological damage.


February 24, 2014--More quagga mussels found in Lake Powell; Is the Lower Colorado River ecosystem at risk? (Summit Voice)

The battle to keep Lake Powell free of non-native mussels is tilting toward the aquatic invaders and federal resource managers are concerned the invaders may spread into Glen Canyon.


February 1, 2014--Wildlife agency explains $10 million cut (Cortez Journal)

Fishing is fun, but the fun is no longer funded. A $500,000 cut to the Fishing is Fun program is just one way that Colorado Parks and Wildlife is trimming expenses by $10 million. Leaders from the agency went before state senators Thursday to explain the cuts.


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