Columbia River

October 15, 2014--The Columbia, a gem of a notion (Californian)

We can no longer waste our precious fresh water. Instead of just dumping the Columbia River into the Pacific Ocean at Astoria, Ore., we should recycle it. In less than six months, America could install a 25-foot diameter poly pipe upon the continental shelf, annually transporting 25 million acre feet of clean fresh water to California.

July 9, 2014--NASA satellites detect possible disastrous flooding months in advance, finds research (Water World)

According to new research from UC Irvine, data from NASA satellites can greatly improve predictions of how likely a river basin is to overflowing months before it actually does. The use of such data, which capture a much fuller picture of how water is accumulating, could result in earlier flood warnings, potentially saving lives and property.

September 27, 2013--Can dams help buffer global warming impacts? (Summit Voice)

For all the environmental mayhem they’ve caused in the past, dams may help buffer some aquatic ecosystems from future global warming impacts, according to a new study from Oregon State University. Specifically, the researchers said dams could provide “ecological and engineering resilience” to climate change in the Columbia River basin.

June 15, 2011--Climate change and the west: A picture of the western United States in the coming decades (Environmental News Network)

Last week findings of a study by the U.S. Geological Survey show a sharp decline in the snowpack of the northern Rocky Mountains over the past 30 years.

September 16, 2009--New Northwest salmon plan modifies Bush approach (Los Angeles Times)

Fisheries managers announced Tuesday that they would enhance but not significantly alter the government's current strategy for saving salmon from extinction in the rivers of the Pacific Northwest, drawing criticism from conservationists.

May 19, 2009 --If salmon can't be saved, Snake River dams may have to go (L.A. Times)

For years, the federal government has struggled to find a way to operate the massive hydropower system on the Columbia and Snake rivers in the Pacific Northwest--and also try to recover the endangered salmon that are all-too-frequently slaughtered at the massive dams as they make their way up and down the river.

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