Aquifers

July 17, 2015--How the West overcounts its water supplies (New York Times)

Paul Matuska is the closest thing the American West has to a water cop, and his beat includes Needles, Calif., a beleaguered desert town midway between Flagstaff, Ariz., and Los Angeles. About 4,800 people live in Needles, on the western bank of the Colorado River where it cuts a swath in the mud between California and Arizona.


June 30, 2015--Here's how U.S. groundwater travels the globe via food (Smithsonian)

Freshwater in the United States is really on the move. Much of the water pulled from underground reservoirs called aquifers gets incorporated into crops and other foodstuffs, which are then are shuttled around the country or transferred as far away as Israel and Japan, according to a new study.


June 27, 2015--World’s aquifers losing replenishment race, researchers say (New York Times)

From the Arabian Peninsula to northern India to California’s Central Valley, nearly a third of the world’s 37 largest aquifers are being drained faster than they are being replenished, according to a recent study led by scientists at the University of California, Irvine.


February 18, 2015--Pinching our aquifer piggy banks in California, Colorado and beyond (Mountain Town News)

To grasp the immensity of the groundwater pumping in California during the last century, think back to the last time you flew into Las Vegas. Before descending into McCarran International Airport, you may have swept across Lake Mead. When full, the reservoir is 112 miles long and up to 532 feet deep.


January 24, 2015--Report: Farming and urban growth are polluting America’s aquifers (Circle of Blue)

Farming and urban growth, two forces that are reshaping the land surface, are also changing the chemistry and physical properties of the nation’s aquifers, leading to greater concentrations of natural and manmade pollutants that could persist for decades in essential underground water sources, according to a comprehensive U.S.


October 15, 2014--Time for a serious policy on water pricing (Bloomberg Businessweek)

Do you know the price of your monthly cell phone bill? I bet you do. How about your water bill? What’s the cost difference between taking a shower for 5 minutes or 30 minutes? Most Americans consume plenty of clean water without worrying much, if at all, about its price. Yet which is more valuable, water or a smartphone?


August 18, 2014--The cup's half full without groundwater regulation (Los Angeles Times)

They're all patting themselves on the back in the state Capitol for finally achieving a water bond deal. And that's fine. It was a momentous act. But what really would be historic — and worth running self-congratulatory reelection ads about — would be to pair the bond proposal with even more important groundwater regulation.

August 17, 2014--West’s historic drought stokes fears of water crisis (Washington Post)

When the winter rains failed to arrive in this Sacramento Valley town for the third straight year, farmers tightened their belts and looked to the reservoirs in the nearby hills to keep them in water through the growing season.


August 9, 2014--In dry California, water goes to those who drill the deepest (Al Jazeera America)

The only sign of life sprouting out of a vast expanse of land in this unincorporated corner of Tulare County is a large drilling rig and two trucks laden with 1,000-foot-long drill pipes. Men in hard hats work round the clock in sweltering 100-plus degree temperatures and in the still of the night, under the glare of construction night lights.


July 29, 2014--Groundwater pumping causes ground to drop (Press-Enterprise)

Creating a lush, artificial oasis in the Coachella Valley has siphoned away so much underground water that the land above it is sinking. Land surfaces declined nine inches to two feet in some areas of Palm Desert, Indian Wells, and La Quinta between 1995 and 2010 because so much groundwater was being pumped from the aquifers beneath, according to a 17-year study done by the U.S.


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