Buy-And-Dry

March 13, 2016--Western Slope interests not sold on latest flex bill (Pueblo Chieftain)

A bill that would allow half of a farmer’s water to be transferred for one year to other uses passed the House agriculture committee 8-5 Monday. The bill, HB1228, was opposed by Western Slope water districts and legislators as unnecessary, expensive to farmers or ranchers and potentially harmful by allowing water that could be used within the state to flow out. Former state Sen.


Colorado’s Buy-and-Grow vs. Buy-and-Dry Program

Agricultural buy-and-dry occurs when someone purchases land and moves the water into the municipal system. There are mounting fears, however, that permanent dry-up of agricultural lands could potentially cripple the farming industry in Colorado. Alternatively, a buy-and-grow plan would allow farmers to share their water rights with municipalities--essentially a sharing of water rights between rural and urban communities. According to a recent Durango Herald article, with the buy-and-grow plan governments and private interests could help farmers with investments in water-conservation technology and other equipment, thereby helping farmers grow. The farmers would then share the water that they don’t need anymore because of the savings. In the article, Kelly Brough said that “They’re still growing, still producing, they’re more efficient, and they don’t lose their water right.” Brough is the Chief Executive of the Denver Metro Chamber of Commerce (DMCC). At an early October meeting in Denver with state and local water officials, hosted by the DMCC, Brough indicated that the buy-and-grow plan could usher in a new wave of water policy. To view the full article visit the Durango Herald


February 10, 2015--House approves ‘flex-use’ water bill (Grand Junction Sentinel)

Several Western Slope lawmakers didn’t get their way Tuesday on a bill that is designed to prevent so-called buy-and-dry tactics on water rights for farms and ranches.


May 6, 2014--Some worried trans-mountain diversions are taking a backseat in Colo. water talks (Fence Post)

A northern Colorado water official expressed concern this week that talks of bringing more Western Slope water across the Continental Divide might take a backseat to other aspects of the long-term, comprehensive Colorado Water Plan. The statewide water plan — put in motion by Gov.


May 1, 2014--Official says bringing more West Slope water to Front Range as part of Colorado Water Plan critical (Greeley Tribune)

A northern Colorado water official expressed concern this week that talks of bringing more Western Slope water across the Continental Divide might take a backseat to other aspects of the long-term, comprehensive Colorado Water Plan. The statewide water plan — put in motion by Gov.


December 3, 2009--Summit discusses water issues with growing population (Greeley Tribune)

A recent United Nations report indicated that about 70 percent more food will be needed in the world by 2040 as the world's population expands. “How are we going to do that without water?” Pat O'Toole asked a crowd of more than 100 people Tuesday at the 2009 Ag Water Summit, conducted at the Jefferson County Fairgrounds.


January 9, 2009--State water needs on collision course (Pueblo Chieftain)

While competing water needs are on a collision course in Colorado, land-use decision-makers and water providers have barely begun to talk about how to deal with shortfalls. That was the assessment of Harris Sherman, executive director of the Colorado Department of Natural Resources, at a meeting of Action 22 Thursday at Colorado State University-Pueblo.

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