Hydraulic Fracturing

USGS Study Points to Fracking’s Thirst

A new study by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in partnership with the American Geophysical Union, indicates that hydraulic fracking operations in the U.S. has skyrocketed in the last 15 years, consuming more than 28 times the water they did a mere decade and a half  ago.


July 1, 2015--Water use for fracking has skyrocketed, stressing drought-ridden states (EcoWatch)

Fracking operations in the U.S. have gotten thirstier in the last 15 years, consuming more than 28 times the water they did a mere 15 years ago. A new study by the U.S.


EPA Study Confirms Fracking Affects Drinking Water

In June the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced that fracking does pollute drinking water, with the release of the draft final version of its study of Hydraulic Fracturing for Oil and Gas and Its Potential Impact on Drinking Water Resources.


June 5, 2015--Study confirms: Fracking affects drinking water (Pagosa Daily Post)

In a watershed moment, today EPA announced fracking does pollute drinking water — with the release of the draft final version of its study of Hydraulic Fracturing for Oil and Gas and Its Potential Impact on Drinking Water Resources. Congress commissioned the study in 2010 in response to increasing public questions about the risks posed to drinking water by the unconventional oil


April 24, 2015--Oil and gas drilling is consuming millions of acres of US farmland: Study (International Business Times)

As oil and gas drilling ramps up in the central U.S. and Canada, the region is losing an increasing amount of cropland, ranches and forests to industrial activities. In recent years, huge swaths of the Great Plains have given way to well sites, oil pads, parking lots and gravel roads that service the energy industry, researchers say.


December 4, 2014--Not enough water for farmers and frackers (Water Online)

A new research report by MSCI Inc. says that in the coming years, there will be a clash between industry and agriculture over water resources. As The Guardian recently put it, "Which would you rather have: lettuce and carrots for your salads, or affordable gasoline for your car?


West Slope: Water and Energy Collision Course?

According to a July High Country News article, if you thought fracking was a water-guzzling method to get the oil and gas flowing from shale, then you should check out oil shale retorting.


September 2, 2014--Water stress may curtail fracking, says WRI (BBC News)

Water shortages could hinder fracking for shale oil and gas in many parts of the world, the World Resources Institute (WRI) has said. In the first report of its kind, the WRI found that 38% of the world's shale resources were in arid areas or in those with severe water stress. Accessing fresh water was likely to present "serious challenges", it said.


August 4, 2014--Fracking without fresh water (High Country News)

In 1913, a Toronto lawyer named David Fasken bought 220,000 acres of ranchland in west Texas, sight unseen. He intended to subdivide the land, on the arid Llano Estacado, into farm plots. But he abandoned that idea once he saw how little water there was.


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