Water Use Audits Offered to Farmers!

Farmers consume nearly 90 percent of Colorado's water, and Colorado State University is offering ways for them to use it more efficiently. A grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture to CSU's Center for Agricultural Energy will pay for reduced-cost irrigation efficiency audits for growers with center pivot systems.

September 29, 2015--Water users seek ways to avoid forced cutbacks (Pine River Times)

The nightmare scenario for West Slope water nerds is a "call" on the Colorado River, meaning that Colorado, Wyoming, and Northwest New Mexico are not delivering a legally required amount of water to California, Nevada, Arizona, and Utah. If or when that happens, some water users in the three Upper Basin states will have their water use curtailed so that the Lower Basin sta

September 22, 2015--UN report shows staggering cost of land degradation (Summit Voice)

Unsustainable land-use practices are a $6.3 trillion drain on the global economy, according to a new report from the United Nations University, which assesses the value of ecosystem services provided by land resources such as food, poverty reduction, clean water, climate and disease regulation and nutrients cycling. That figure is equal to about 15 percent of global GDP, the researcher sai

September 21, 2015--State agrees to improve flows on Lower Dolores (Durango Herald)

Colorado’s top water board agreed Tuesday to improve flows on the Lower Dolores River to boost the health of the river and its native fish. The Colorado Water Conservation Board will seek an in-stream flow right of up to 900 cubic feet per second on the Lower Dolores below its confluence with the San Miguel River. In-stream flows are designated by the board to preserve an

September 19, 2015--Lawmaker wary of fracking wastewater on crops (Water Online)

A California legislator wants foods made with crops that rely on recycled fracking wastewater to be labelled as such. “Assemblyman Mike Gatto, D-Glendale, said such water might include harmful contaminants, including carcinogens,” Capital Public Radio reported. “Oil companies sell Central Valley farms millions of gallons of treated wastewater every day for irrigation.

August 2, 2015--Hydro-powered irrigation: Colorado makes water work (Earth Techling)

Much of the west coast’s water comes from the Colorado river, which, as its name suggests, originates high in the Rocky Mountains of Colorado. The current drought is most severe at the end of the line in Nevada and California, but Colorado is also drying out. Restrictions on residential water use are helping, but can only do so much.

July 10, 2015--It's about to get easier for California farmers to conserve water—and sell it (CityLab)

There’s no “solving” California’s drought, as so many headlines suggest. Drought is a regular feature of the Western climate cycle.

July 1, 2015--Federal farming incentives contribute to the "killing" of the Colorado River (Aspen Public Radio)

Incentives from the federal government for farmers who grow crops like cotton are contributing to the depletion of the Colorado River. A Propublica report this spring investigated the issue. The article’s author was at the Aspen Ideas Festival Tuesday (6/30).

June 30, 2015--Here's how U.S. groundwater travels the globe via food (Smithsonian)

Freshwater in the United States is really on the move. Much of the water pulled from underground reservoirs called aquifers gets incorporated into crops and other foodstuffs, which are then are shuttled around the country or transferred as far away as Israel and Japan, according to a new study.

New Water Rights Transfer

The non-profit Colorado Water Trust and the Colorado Water Conservation Board (CWCB) have unveiled a creative new way for agricultural water rights holders to be compensated for sharing their water to meet conservation goals. The two organizations have collaborated to restore late summer flows to a 5-mile stretch of the Little Cimarron River in the Gunnison River Basin by sharing an agricultural water right.

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