Agriculture

March 17, 2015--California water anxiety syndrome: Feel it yet? (San Francisco Chronical)

The feeling is inescapable, palpable, more than a little scary. I’m talking about California Water Anxiety Syndrome (CWAS), of course, that sinking feeling to trump all sinking feelings, that sour knot in the pit of the collective stomach, unnerving and strange and, let’s just admit, unutterably depressing. California, as you might have heard, is running out of water.


March 13, 2015--Record low snowpack in Western US (Crop Site)

"Nearly a third of our SNOTEL sites in the Cascades and Sierra Nevada are reporting the lowest snowpack ever measured," NRCS Hydrologist Cara McCarthy said. "For the first time, some sites were snow-free on March 1st. These areas can expect reduced summer streamflow." Recent storms helped relieve dry conditions in the Southwest.


March 13, 2015--As drought worsens, L.A. water agency offers cash to Sacramento Valley farmers (Sacramento Bee)

With the drought stretching into its fourth year, a heavyweight water agency from Los Angeles has come calling on Sacramento Valley rice farmers, offering up to $71 million for some of their water. The price being offered is so high, some farmers can make more from selling water than from growing their rice.


March 12, 2015--New fertilizer heralded for yield, lower water demand (TheCalifornian.com)

A new type of fertilizer introduced in Salinas last week has been shown to reduce nitrogen runoff, increase yield and lower water demand, particularly for almonds, a $246 million crop in Tulare County, while using produce scraps as a base ingredient. Still in early stage expansion mode, Sacramento-based California Safe Soil, or CSS, has plans to build five plants over the next five years a


March 10, 2015--Disaster damage expected to hit $300 billion yearly as events intensify (Reuters)

Investing in insurance programs for poor farmers today could save tens of billions of dollars in coming decades as climate change upsets growing patterns and makes harvests fail, U.N.


March 10, 2015--Long Hollow reservoir filling (Durango Herald)

Rain and snowmelt runoff have provided the first water for a reservoir on Long Hollow Creek near Redmesa, a long-planned storage unit that will help Colorado meet its contractual water obligation to New Mexico and indirectly provide water for irrigators in the southwest corner of La Plata County. Construction was completed in June 2014 on the Bobby K.


March 7, 2015--Rep. River agreement increases supplies for irrigation (Grand Island Independent)

Some surface water irrigators in Nebraska’s part of the Republican Basin will get more water for their 2015 crops than originally expected as a result of an agreement signed Friday through the Republican River Compact Administration. The 1943 compact allocates a percentage of the water available annually to Nebraska, Colorado and Kansas. The agreement includes the U.S.


March 2, 2015--State Supreme Court to weigh water diversion (Aspen Journal)

A water court case in Pueblo over the size of water rights from the upper Fryingpan River delivered through the Busk-Ivanhoe tunnel to the East Slope has now blossomed into a Colorado Supreme Court case full of powerful interests opposing each other across the Continental Divide.


February 28, 2015--First global pesticide runoff map shows streams at risk (Environmental News Network)

The application of insecticides poisons streams in roughly 40 percent of the global land surface, new research reveals. Streams in the United States, the Mediterranean, Central America and Southeast Asia are most at risk.


February 28, 2015--Calif. farms to go without federal water again in 2015 (Capital Press)

Many farms in California’s Central Valley will have to do without federal water again this year unless big spring storms replenish the state’s woeful mountain snowpack. The U.S. Bureau of Reclamation’s initial allocation, announced Feb.


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